Norwegian: forestillingsliv? hengebunnen?

QuinnFox

New Member
English
Can anyone help me with these? I'm trying to figure out English equivalents for them. I understand the gist of what "forestillingsliv" means, but I'm thinking perhaps it's a specific term of art in Freudian psychology and must have an exact English equivalent, but I'm not finding it.

"Disse innfall eller assosiasjoner kan i en rekke tilfeller avsløre hvilket tankeinnhold som skjuler seg bak drømmens flimrende strøm av bilder, og ved å følge en enkelt slik assosiasjonsbane kan det ofte lykkes oss å trenge ned til helt skjulte komplekser av forestillinger, ned til det såkalte fortrengte forestillingsliv –"

"All sokning efter liket er imidlertid nytteløs på grunn av hengebunnen i tjernet."

Thanks in advance for any help!
 
  • AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    Swedish, Finnish
    Forestillningsliv - imaginative life, I think the term in Freudian psychology is fantasy.

    Hengebunnen - the words are hang/hanging and bottom, but I don't know what a hanging bottom in a pond would be.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Freud uses a word that is translated into forestillingsliv here:
    "Drømmen kan ikke sammenliknes med de uregelmessige lyder som oppstår i et musikkinstrument når det blir truffet av tilfeldige, ytre krefter istedenfor av en musikers hånd, drømmen er ikke meningsløs, ikke absurd, forutsetter ikke at en del av vårt forestillingsliv sover mens en annen del begynner å våkne"

    The English translation is:
    "Dreams are not comparable to the spontaneous sounds made by a musical instrument struck rather by some external force than by the hand of a performer; they are not meaningless, not absurd, they do not imply that one portion of our stockpile of ideas sleeps while another begins to awaken."

    So here it is translated as stockpile of ideas. I have also seen it translated in this context as store of ideas. I'm not sure how useful that is, but it's the best I can do.

    I don't think fantasy is correct. Freud used the German word Phantasie, which is normally translated as phantasy in English, as it is used in a particular Freudian sense. The obvious Norwegian translation would be fantasi, or some variant of that word, but I have not managed to verify that.
     
    You are right. Based on Swedish föreställningsliv, which is rarely used and close to the more common föreställningsvärld, it is likely to connote something like frame of reference, mindset, universe of ideas, system of conceptions.
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    "All sokning efter liket er imidlertid nytteløs på grunn av hengebunnen i tjernet."

    I suspect the English is false bottom.
    That seems right, but "hengebunn" is an unusual word in Norwegian. I don't think I have seen it anywhere else, and I don't find it in dictionaries. But it must be a parallel to "hengemyr" (quagmire): the bottom of the lake is like a quagmire - things can sink into it and diappear.
     
    Having done some googling on hengebunn I mostly get various DIY instructions. I get the impression that it is a bottom or base that is U-shaped. The idea is perhaps that the lake had a very deep bottom.
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I get the impression that it is a bottom or base that is U-shaped.
    No, I don't think so. It is true that googling gives you completely unrelated things, such as the bottom of "hengekøyer" or "tilhengere", and a couple of references to this text in De dødes tjern. This just shows how unusual this word is. Maybe the author invented it?

    But given the context (that it is impossible to drag the lake for the body), and the fact that "hengemyr" is an ordinary Norwegian word, I still think it is likely that the meaning is that the bottom of the lake is like a hengemyr, and that it has swallowed the body (if there was one).
     

    QuinnFox

    New Member
    English
    Thank you, everyone! I really appreciate the help! I think the "false bottom" thing is right, as is the quagmire -- the author mentions that there is a muddy layer of quicksand-like material about five feet deep, and I'm guessing that bodies might sink through it down to a much deeper bottom below.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Thank you, everyone! I really appreciate the help! I think the "false bottom" thing is right, as is the quagmire -- the author mentions that there is a muddy layer of quicksand-like material about five feet deep, and I'm guessing that bodies might sink through it down to a much deeper bottom below.
    Yes, I have also just found this in the first chapter of the book, which was a free sample of the ebook version, which also supports that idea:
    3.png
     
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