Norwegian: Imperative

BasedowLives

Senior Member
uSa
hey all.

i was wondering about commands in norwegian.

ha det bra <--is this the same thing as a command, like basically telling them to have it good? and if so, do you just use that form of the verb? eg, telling someone "go" would simply be "gå"?

or maybe i'm way off and it's much more complicated than that...

while i'm at it, i have another question...I've noticed some R's are rolled and some R's aren't. does it vary from region to region or is it only in certain words that the R's are rolled?

thanks a lot
 
  • Elieri

    Member
    Sweden
    well, I can't really speak for norwegian but at least "ha det bra" is as much a command as telling someone to have a nice day... If norwegian works the same as swedish here, the shaping of imperatives is a bit irregular; for exampel is "spring" the imperative of "springa" (to run) and "gör" the imperativ of "göra" (to do) while in other cases you keep the ending and use the infinitive as the imperative. But you should wait for natives, I really don't know if this is true for norwegian.
     

    Gremli Skremli

    Member
    Norwegian, Norway
    In Norwegian it's like explained in Swedish. I know that with infinitives who end with e (in bokmål), the imperative looses the e. So "springe" = "spring".
    And yes, "ha det bra" means literary "have it well".
     

    gisele73

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Peru
    BasedowLives said:
    hey all.

    i was wondering about commands in norwegian.

    ha det bra <--is this the same thing as a command, like basically telling them to have it good? and if so, do you just use that form of the verb? eg, telling someone "go" would simply be "gå"?

    or maybe i'm way off and it's much more complicated than that...

    while i'm at it, i have another question...I've noticed some R's are rolled and some R's aren't. does it vary from region to region or is it only in certain words that the R's are rolled?

    thanks a lot

    Hi,

    Your first question has been already answered, but when it comes to the second, about the pronounciation of the "r", it depends on the region, city, etc..., and not on the words.

    I live in the south of Norway and here people roll the "r", a little French like", in other cities they roll it even more, and in others not at all. For me it is much easier to understand people who don't roll the "r", like in Oslo for example, and that is because that "r" is more similar to "my" Spanish "r".

    There are many dialects in Norway, and the differences between them are more than just the pronounciation of the "r"... I wish it was just that!, but no, so it is not easy to understand sometimes, when you are learning the language.

    Ha det bra ;)
     
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