Norwegian: tullete

littlepond

Senior Member
Hindi
Hei alle sammen!

I came upon the phrase "En tullete formulering" here. The article is saying, as far as I understood, that in Norway those who are without papers are afraid to go the doctors, until a health emergeny arises, when they are helped, as the law says then you can help them. Then, it says that that is a dumb rule, I guess.

My question is why "tullete": there's no definite article, nor plural? I can see in ordbook dictionary that "tullete" is very much there as singular adjective (it gives the example "en tullete regel"): maybe it's just the way it is? If so, can one replace by "tullet", or is "tullete" (more) idiomatic?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It is the adjective corresponding to the noun tull - rubbish or nonsense - and means stupid, ridiculous, nonsensical, or something like that. As far as I know tullet is not a word.

    The noun is often used in the phrase det er bare tull - it's complete nonsense.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Thanks @winenous! A hardback dictionary I own has actually only "tullet", not "tullete": and it gives the meaning as "crazy", with the example "bli tullet": go crazy. The online ordbook gives both "tullete" and "tullet". I guess "tullet" is by elision of "tullete". And I guess from your answer that anyway one can forget about "tullet", even if it were to exist, and just remember "tullete".
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Just checked my dictionary, and it lists the adjective "tullet(e)". So it takes an "e" if required according the rules for adjectives. My Norwegian wife says "en tullet regel" sounds better than "en tullete regel".
     

    myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    My question is why "tullete": there's no definite article, nor plural? I can see in ordbook dictionary that "tullete" is very much there as singular adjective (it gives the example "en tullete regel"): maybe it's just the way it is? If so, can one replace by "tullet", or is "tullete" (more) idiomatic?
    Adjectives that are derived from noun + et(e) such as hårete, horete, grisete, fjollete, tantete and so on are generally unvariable in the sense that they resist taking inflexional morphology with the exception of definite -e.

    Just checked my dictionary, and it lists the adjective "tullet(e)". So it takes an "e" if required according the rules for adjectives. My Norwegian wife says "en tullet regel" sounds better than "en tullete regel".
    This is subject to dialectal variation.
     

    winenous

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Thanks, @myšlenka. So are you saying that the adjective forms with the "e" are more common - even when the noun is indefinite and singular? But some dialects are more accepting of the form without the "e" in those cases?
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I think so, even though I don't know any systematic study of the use of these forms. This may be a case where dictionaries don't match what people actually say and write. I say and write "en tullete regel" and "en humpete vei", regardless of what the dictionary says.

    I agree that this varies between dialects. The dialects of Trøndelag and Northern Norway don't have this final "e". But these dialects also drop the final vocal in many other words, so that is not specific for this group of words.
     
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