not cleavage

I wonder what it is called where two slopes of mountains meet, making a shape somewhat like a cleavage (but I don't think I can use that word). I want to describe the sun setting in such a place.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Cleft between the mountains" might work, botcc.
    Sam's Mum will have something to say about that, Loob.

    How about?: canyon, cut, gap, gorge, passage, coulee, dale, dell, dingle, glen, gorge, swale, trough, vale, valley, gulch, gulley, pass, valley, ravine, chasm, defile, fissure. I can't think of any others at the moment.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I would simply say:

    The sun was setting between the two mountains.

    Without more detail on the actual mountouns involved, anything else would be pure conjecture.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi TT!:)

    You're right that "cleft" can have, erm, connotations (though not the same ones as "cleavage", self-evidently).

    I still think (hope?) that you can say "the sun set in the cleft between the mountains" without giving rise to sniggers.

    I have sent an SOS to sam's mum; we sorely need her advice...
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    boy_on_the_christmas_tree,

    I'm sorry but I really dislike "cleft." You started out in your thread title with cleavage. That's about as soft a terrain as you're going to find! Those are mountains that are rich, full, and plump - leaning toward each other. The crevice in between is much more shadowed and beckoning.

    I like "hollow."

    The depths of a healthy cleavage are mysterious, dark, and bewitching.

    If that's your standard of the starting point (cleavage) - and you said it, not us - I like hollow.

    You could also see it from the sunset's point of view:
    The sunset rested on Mother Nature's fertile groove before slipping out of sight.

    I'm not saying that's it exactly, but you get the picture. :D

    AngelEyes
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    "We continue walking as we watch the sun’s bright red gleam disappear inside a cleft where the slopes of two mountains meet."
    Yes, with the addition of your picture, my other post is extremely wrong. Hopefully, this one won't be.

    Those two rocky mountains bear no resemblance to any kind of breasts. I would even add that very word: rocky in your sentence.

    When you originally stated "cleavage", that was a situation that required softer-sounding words.

    This is craggy and hard and more primitive.

    I'm not even sure I'd use slopes here. These look more like hard shoulders.

    Here's one suggestion:

    "We continue walking as we watch the sun’s bright red gleam disappear inside a chasm where the hard shoulders of two rocky mountains meet."

    My point is to propose you use words that are rugged and more masculine.

    AngelEyes
     

    sam's mum

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi TT!:)

    You're right that "cleft" can have, erm, connotations (though not the same ones as "cleavage", self-evidently).

    I still think (hope?) that you can say "the sun set in the cleft between the mountains" without giving rise to sniggers.

    I have sent an SOS to sam's mum; we sorely need her advice...
    Sorry to be late, chaps, I didn't see the message. I have just run cleft past my sons and step-daughter (21,17 and 16) and they don't see any sexual connotations at all. (It does make them think of cleft palate/lip, though.) For me also it's a neutral word in this situation. Hope that helps!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I was actually thinking of something more like this: http://provencediary.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/11/08/luberonwalk.jpg

    The sentence now is: "We continue walking as we watch the sun’s bright red gleam disappear inside a cleft where the slopes of two mountains meet."
    Hmm... well, given this picture, I have questions about the other words. There are no "slopes" in sight in the picture. A slope is an incline, usually smooth. What I see here is what I would call a canyon. The rock features would be canyon walls to me. If the canyon did not lead anywhere I would call it a box canyon.

    It looks deeper and longer than a ravine to me and smaller than a rift. I think of a rift as being a huge land feature, stretching for hundreds of miles.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I have just run cleft past my sons and step-daughter (21,17 and 16) and they don't see any sexual connotations at all. (It does make them think of cleft palate/lip, though.) For me also it's a neutral word in this situation.
    Thank you, sam's mum (and family!). I'm glad that it is still possible to use "cleft" without sexual connotations: I was beginning to doubt myself there...

    Just for fun, I googled "sun * in a cleft between * mountains". No hits with setting suns; but here (right hand side, seventh line from bottom) is a rising one:)
     

    casebook

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    If you use the Urban Dictionary to which TT refers above, yo will find that practically everything has a dirty meaning! Rift included. I find it regrettable how the language is being massacred!
     

    sam's mum

    Senior Member
    England English
    Just a quick note on Angel Eyes' hard shoulders. In British English the hard shoulder is the emergency lane on a motorway. That's the image that springs to mind when I hear this!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top