Not educated VS Uneducated

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TroubleEnglish

Senior Member
Russian
Is there any difference in

1) He is not educated

2) He is uneducated
?

And if there is no, is it possible to make negation with other words by putting "not" in front of them?

If you have different negation prefixes (un, mis, dis etc.) and every word has its own own, for example

"Understand" can have only "mis" (if I am not mistaken).

I was misunderstood

But if I am not sure which prefix I have to use with, for example, "understand" can I just put "not" before it to have the same sense?

I was not understood

The same with "not educated" and "uneducated"
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I was misunderstood

    But if I am not sure which prefix I have to use with, for example, "understand" can I just put "not" before it to have the same sense?

    I was not understood
    Not in this case.

    Not understanding something is not the same as the somebody getting what was not intended.

    Compare:
    I tried to order lunch in Mexico, but the waiter spoke no English and I was not understood, so I went elsewhere.
    I tried to order chicken enchiladas in Mexico, but the waiter brought pork, because he misunderstood my order.
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Not in this case.

    Not understanding something is not the same as the somebody getting what was not intended.

    Compare:
    I tried to order lunch in Mexico, but the waiter spoke no English and I was not understood, so I went elsewhere.
    I tried to order chicken enchiladas in Mexico, but the waiter brought pork, because he misunderstood my order.
    Hm, it's curious, but what about "uneducated-not educated"?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hm, it's curious, but what about "uneducated-not educated"?
    There's something of the same issue here, since the words can be perceived differently. In addition, choice of a word can be subject to idiomatic usage.
    That's why we always plead for complete sentences of sufficient length to understand the intent, as well as context. ;)
     

    TroubleEnglish

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There's something of the same issue here, since the words can be perceived differently. In addition, choice of a word can be subject to idiomatic usage.
    That's why we always plead for complete sentences of sufficient length to understand the intent, as well as context. ;)
    So it can be understood differently, too?

    If we have a short sentence like

    He is not educated

    He is uneducated


    will it be enough to see some difference?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I can't see a difference between the two. I think we are more likely to say 'He is uneducated'. I believe that 'not educated' is usually found in verb forms: He was not educated with the other children.

    As you can see, different examples work differently. We will not be able to give you a general rule to apply to all of them. If you have a question about a different adjective, please start a new thread to ask it. Provide a sentence and say something about the situation in which you would use it.
     
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