not happy and even a little angry

ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello, everyone:

My daughter and her classmates had a dance practice, the teacher said Lily could dance better than my daughter so she arranged Lily to stand in the middle. My daughter was not happy with this because she was better than Lily, so she said: "I can dance better than Lily, I should stand in the middle. "

She was not happy and even a little angry because she hated the teacher saying she danced worse, it was not true.
Do you have a more specific word to describe her feeling here?

I don't want to ask for a list, but I think "not happy and even a little angry" has a very broad meaning, a person can also be "not happy and even a little angry" in other circumstances. However, I can't think of a more accurate word in this case. If there is no better word, you can also tell me this.

Thank you.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    She felt resentful because the teacher said Lily danced better than her.

    Resent (WR dictionary): to feel or show displeasure or anger at (something or someone), because of a feeling of having been insulted or wronged: The older brother resented his younger sister's success, claiming she was just lucky.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    There is a noun "chagrin" which fits quite well in meaning here, but you'd have to recast the sentence to use the noun.

    According to our dictionary it can also be used as a verb, though I have never really noticed it being used that way myself.
    chagrin - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    This thread offers a good discussion on how we use this word:
    much to my chagrin

    Why I think it suits is because I imagine your daughter's feelings are around a loss of face when the other girl is favoured by the teacher.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    There is a noun "chagrin" which fits quite well in meaning here, but you'd have to recast the sentence to use the noun.
    'Chagrin' is not a word you hear much here, probably because most people don't know whether they should stick to the French pronunciation or go with the English one. :D:)

    'Ticked off' was an expression that came immediately to mind, but I don't think it's used in American English.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    'Chagrin' is not a word you hear much here, probably because most people don't know whether they should stick to the French pronunciation or go with the English one. :D:)

    'Ticked off' was an expression that came immediately to mind, but I don't think it's used in American English.
    Interesting!
    To be honest you don't hear chagrin much here either but I like the combo of moods in suggests.

    "Ticked off" is not widely used to suggest your own mood in the UK. More often it is used as something one person does to another, as a mild rebuke:
    "The fellah ticked off the kids for playing football on his lawn"."
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    "Ticked off" is not widely used to suggest your own mood in the UK. More often it is used as something one person does to another, as a mild rebuke:
    "The fellah ticked off the kids for playing football on his lawn"."
    It's the opposite here. It's rarely used to mean to reprimand. We do, however, get ticked off about a lot of things. :rolleyes: :D
     
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