<not like> having a sock here means you can't get rid of me

VicNicSor

Senior Member
Russian
After having a relationship with a guy for 8 months she still don't consider him her boyfriend. And says to him he's got to leave now, even though he'd rather stay. Then he asks if he may keep a pair of jeans at her place. She says no. Then he asks how about one sock.
REBECCA: What are you gonna do with just one sock?
BRET: Is that a yes?
REBECCA: No! Get out of here. I have work tomorrow.
BRET: Not like having a sock here means you can't get rid of me. Socks are not anchors.
Lights Out, movie

Does it mean: "It's not that I want to leave a sock here because I want you to not be able to get rid of me." ?
Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I think so, though your sentence is a bit hard to wade through. I would rephrase the original sentence as "You can still get rid of me even if I leave a sock here." Your version implies some intention on Bret's part that is not in the original.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "You can still get rid of me even if I leave a sock here."
    That's shorter and clearer, indeed. Thank you.
    Your version implies some intention on Bret's part that is not in the original.
    Maybe my wording wasn't very clear, I meant:
    "The reason why I want to leave a sock here is not because I want you to not be able to get rid of me."
    Is that better?...
     
    Last edited:

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I understand your point, but I still disagree. Bret isn't saying anything about his motivation or what he wants.He's simply saying that a sock left behind won't keep Rebecca from getting rid of him.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top