NOT LITTLE for a cup of coffee ....

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mondobeagle

New Member
Italiano
Hi,
I've got two urgent questions if somebody can help me:

<< First question has its own thread.>>
2. Would it be correct to say: "80p IS NOT LITTLE for a cup of coffee"? (I know I can say 80p IS NOT MUCH, but how can I say the opposite?)
THANK YOU
 
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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi mondobeagle

    Well, technically, "80p is not a little for a cup of coffee" would be correct, grammatically. But in this context, it would sound literary - and therefore rather strange:(.

    The natural thing to say if you want the opposite of "80p is not much for a cup of coffee", is "80p is a lot for a cup of coffee".

    Welcome to the forums!:)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    How about:
    "80p is too much for a cup of coffee."
    (I'm not really clear on what the "opposite" of a vague term means so I think there may be several possibilities that don't have exactly the same meaning.)
     

    mondobeagle

    New Member
    Italiano
    Thank you both. I just wanted to make sure that "80p is not little" is not correct.
    So "80p is not A LITTLE" would be correct, right?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    So "80p is not A LITTLE" would be correct, right?
    It would be 'grammatically correct'. But it's not what native English speakers would say:(.

    Instead, we'd say "80p is a lot" - or, as Myridon suggests, "80p is too much". (Liliana's "80p is not cheap" would also work.)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it's very odd to say "80p is a not a little for a cup of coffee" even if it is grammatical, which I'll have to take Loob's word for. There's more to language than grammar - usage and idiom are very important too. If nobody ever uses the form of expression in question, it is not 'correct' in my book. The usual 'opposite' of not much is a lot.
    :)

    Hermione
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I was in Starbucks recently and I ordered a cup of coffee, when I was apprised of the price I asked, "Can you wait until my second mortgage is approved?"

    Personally I would said "dear", but it would sound unusual to most people. "Really? Four dollars and ninety-five cents for a cup of coffee. A bit dear if you ask me."

    I think most people would say, "I don't like to drink coffee at Starbucks; their coffee is too expensive."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In conclusion: "80p is A LITTLE for a cup of coffee" is fine?
    No, it isn't - how do you conclude that? The normal 'opposite' of "£1 is not much for a cup of coffee" is "£7 is a lot for a cup of coffee", as Loob said in Post 2. Forget about 'little' or 'a little' Are you doing an exercise that requires using a little/little? In that case you should say so. That's called context.

    Hermione
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    In conclusion: "80p is A LITTLE for a cup of coffee" is fine?
    No it is not. You have been given most of the normal options.

    Cheap coffee
    80p is cheap for a cup of coffee
    80p is not much for a cup ...
    80p is too little for ...

    Dear coffee
    80p is a bit much for ...
    80p is not a little for ... (rather theatrical and not recommended)
    80p is a bit steep for ...

    Expensive coffee
    80p is too much for ...
    80p is a lot for ...

    Starbuck's
    See Packard's post
     

    mondobeagle

    New Member
    Italiano
    That's what it is. It's an exercise and those are the options. I'm sorry, I'm new on this forum and I don't know exactly how it works. But since both sound weird to me, I wanted to hear some native speaker's opinions.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm sorry, I'm new on this forum and I don't know exactly how it works.
    No need to be sorry, you haven't upset anybody here. You asked a question, got some answers, did not fully understand the answers, asked a bit more on the same topic, got more answers - that's exactly how it is supposed to work.

    Time for a nice cup of coffee ;)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    You are right in your instincts and clearly your English is very good. Please tell us exactly what you are supposed to be doing so we can advise you. We don't do people's homework for them as a very general rule but it can happen that a test question or an exercise is very badly worded or even impossible to answer. When we know where people heard what they are asking about or why they are asking, it makes a huge difference to the usefulness of the answer and can save a lot of everybody's time.

    You will find more about all - important context in the Forum Rules in a 'sticky' at the top of the index page.

    We will help you all we can! :)
    Hermione
     

    mondobeagle

    New Member
    Italiano
    actually this is not homework (I would never ask you to do my job) but an exercise about which I had a discussion with a friend.
    someone told him (a native speaker) that "80p is LITTLE for a cup of coffee" was fine. I replyed to him that nobody would use that but I wasn't sure about the grammaticality of my assumption.
    this friend told me later that maybe the correct form was "80p is A LITTLE for a cup of coffee" and this sounded weird to me as well.
     

    gandolfo

    Senior Member
    English-British
    I was in Starbucks recently and I ordered a cup of coffee, when I was apprised of the price I asked, "Can you wait until my second mortgage is approved?"

    Personally I would said "dear", but it would sound unusual to most people. "Really? Four dollars and ninety-five cents for a cup of coffee. A bit dear if you ask me." I'd say dear, doesn't sound unusual to me, also steep, e.g "80p? That's a bit on the steep side!" Off course there's "rip off" "80p? That's a rip off!"

    I think most people would say, "I don't like to drink coffee at Starbucks; their coffee is too expensive." And not good:D
     

    Hillman

    New Member
    English
    If I were to respond philosophically, I would suggest that the opposite of “a little” would be “not a little” in so far as the opposite of “black” would be “not black”. However, since we are referring to appropriateness of language I might be inclined to say: “A cup of coffee for 8p is unreasonable” or, “To ask 8p for a cup of coffee is being unreasonable”: The opposite would likely be “A cup of coffee for 8p is reasonable or quite reasonable” or again, “To ask 8p for a cup of coffee is being unreasonable”.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    actually this is not homework (I would never ask you to do my job) but an exercise about which I had a discussion with a friend.
    someone told him (a native speaker) that "80p is LITTLE for a cup of coffee" was fine. I replyed to him that nobody would use that but I wasn't sure about the grammaticality of my assumption.
    this friend told me later that maybe the correct form was "80p is A LITTLE for a cup of coffee" and this sounded weird to me as well.
    The odd thing to me is that I can add "very" and it sounds fine. "80p is very little (to pay) for a cup of coffee". The bare "little", however, sounds odd to me. Actually, if I add a verb I can imagine "little" by itself. "80p is little to pay/ask/charge for a cup of coffee".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    2. Would it be correct to say: "80p IS NOT LITTLE for a cup of coffee"? (I know I can say 80p IS NOT MUCH, but how can I say the opposite?)
    THANK YOU
    This is your original question, which we answered to the best of our ability but now it seems the real question is whether saying "80p is little for a cup of coffee" is correct. There is nothing wrong with saying that, but it would be even more natural and idiomatic to say "80p is very little to pay".

    The opposite of "little to pay" is not "not little to pay".

    Hermione
     
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