Not only A but also B

wowow

New Member
한국어-ROK
Hello,
I saw this sentence in my grammar book, but I am not sure it is correct to use 'believe' here.

Here is the sentence:
In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also belived that no existing rules applied to him and made seemingly impossible tasks possible.


My grammar book, which is in Korean, says 'rejected and ignored' and 'believed' are correctly used in this sentence. But I thought it should be either 'Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also belief ~' or 'Jobs not only rejected and ignored reality but also believed that~' to make the sentence balanced. (I understand these two sentences have different meanings.)

I'd like to know if the original sentence sounds fine to you and gramatically correct.

Thank you so much for your time:)
 
  • Rhye

    Senior Member
    English - American
    The original sentence is grammatically fine, but your suggestions are also good if you slightly alter the first one: "Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also the belief that..."

    The "not only" can be placed either before (as you suggested) or after (as the grammar book suggested) the verbs; it makes no difference to the meaning of the sentence.
     

    wowow

    New Member
    한국어-ROK
    The original sentence is grammatically fine, but your suggestions are also good if you slightly alter the first one: "Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also the belief that..."

    The "not only" can be placed either before (as you suggested) or after (as the grammar book suggested) the verbs; it makes no difference to the meaning of the sentence.

    Thank you so much for your your quick reply. I've seen many 'not only' sentences, but it was the tricky one that made me confused. I didn't know it is okay to use 'not only' in that way.
    Thanks alot!
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    but your suggestions are also good if you slightly alter the first one:

    Agreed -- except that you need to change it a little bit more, unless you're happy with expressing the exact opposite:
    Jobs not only rejected A but also believed that he can do B.
    vs.
    Jobs not only rejected A but also the belief that he can do B. -> Here he's rejecting A AND the belief of being able to do B!
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I think manfy makes an important distinction.

    It's subtle, but makes all the difference.

    For the OP, I would retain "believed".

    It's not a classic: not only ... but also

    (Which I understand the query to be about.)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also believed that no existing rules applied to him and made seemingly impossible tasks possible.

    The original sentence is not grammatically fine. There's nothing wrong with "believed", but there are other errors: "not only" is wrongly positioned, and "made" has no clear subject.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also believed that no existing rules applied to him and made seemingly impossible tasks possible.

    I think the beef comes with it being parallel or not.

    not only [noun] but also [verb]

    I think purists take issue with that.

    I don't.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    Which is better?

    She speaks not only English, but she also speaks French.
    She speaks not only English, but she speaks also French.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Neither is good. We don’t repeat subject and verb unnecessarily. But the main requirement with “not only … but also …” is that what follows is expressed in the same form in both cases.

    She speaks not only English but French. :tick:

    She not only speaks English, she also speaks French. :tick:
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    Neither is good. We don’t repeat subject and verb unnecessarily. But the main requirement with “not only … but also …” is that what follows is expressed in the same form in both cases.

    She speaks not only English but French. :tick:
    She not only speaks English, she also speaks French. :tick:
    Hi Lingobingo,
    Could you please see these sentences?
    1. Not only Tom but also Bill was sad.
    2. I like eating not only noodles but also pasta.
    3. Maria can not only sing but also dance.

    Self-made

    Have I used "not only ...but also" correctly in these examples?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. :)

    But only no. 3 is the sort of thing you’d expect someone to (literally) say using that rather formal construction. It’s probably used mostly in writing.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    But only no. 3 is the sort of thing you’d expect someone to (literally) say using that rather formal construction. It’s probably used mostly in writing.
    You're saying it's formal construction and used in writing. Can I ask what's the semi-formal/informal construction that's used both in speech and writing?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It depends what it is you want to say. But instead of the full not only … but also format, in casual speech we’d be more likely to say, for example:

    She doesn’t only speak English, she speaks French too.​
    She speaks French as well as English.​
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suppose so. But in practice, if someone actually meant that they’d be more likely to say that she speaks French as well as she does English, or that her French is as good as her English.
     

    SoLaTiDoberman

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi,

    "One sea turtle can make a difference, not only going back to the ocean and having baby sea turtles, but the bigger reach is helping people to care about sea turtles and our oceans," said Bette Zirkelbach, the hospital's general manager.
    Sea turtle released in Florida to compete in Tour de Turtles

    I think what Bette Zirkelbach said should be proofread as the followings:
    1. ... but the bigger reach that (or which) is helping people...
    or
    2. ... but (the bigger reach is) helping people...
    or
    3. ..., but, the bigger reach is, helping people...
    or
    4. ... but helping people to care about sea turtles and our oceans, which is the biggest reach.

    I know the original was okay because it was a spoken language that cannot be that accurate, but I'd like to know if you want to correct the original sentence or if you think the original one is perfectly fine.

    I think in the syntax "not only A, but (also) B," A and B should be in the same grammatical category such as "nouns (including gerund)," "clauses" or "sentences."
    In the original sentence, A is the gerund, but B seems to be a whole sentence, which annoyed me.
    I believe my question is basically the same discussed here, but I'd like to know about this case.

    Thanks!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t agree with any of those proposed amendments, I’m afraid. The original sentence is rather messy, but it’s typical of “live” speech and reasonably comprehensible as it stands. The main problem is the word bigger (a comparative), since nothing has been mentioned to explain what the other part of that comparison is.

    One sea turtle can make a difference, not only [in that it’s] going back to the ocean and having baby sea turtles, but [because] the bigger reach is helping people to care about sea turtles and our oceans," said Bette Zirkelbach, the hospital's general manager.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Going back to the OP (and ignoring the last part of the sentence, which to me makes no sense):

    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored not only reality but also believed that no existing rules applied to him.

    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored reality. :tick:
    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored believed that no existing rules applied to him. :cross:

    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs not only rejected and ignored reality but also believed that no existing rules applied to him.

    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs rejected and ignored reality. :tick:
    In order to achieve his goals, Jobs believed that no existing rules applied to him. :tick:
     

    Andromedino

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I found these sentences in the a textbook:
    A. Lack of sleep is not only bad for your skin and heart, but it also makes you gain weight.
    B. The exercise room is not only big, but it also contains a steam room and a juice bar.

    I personally find the two sentences awkward, as they contradict my knowledge of the use of this phrase.
    The following are the sentences I wrote:
    A(1). Lack of sleep not only is bad for your skin and heart, but also makes you gain weight.
    B(1). The exercise room not only is big, but also contains a steam room and a juice bar.

    I wonder if the sentences I wrote is better than the original ones, or if both versions are acceptable to native speakers.
    Thank you.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Your change from ‘is not only” to “not only is” is unnecessary and less idiomatic.

    Your deletion of “it” in the second clause is more idiomatic than the original. The same would be true of deleting “but” instead, although some people would tell you the comma would then need to be changed to a semicolon.
     

    Andromedino

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Your change from ‘is not only” to “not only is” is unnecessary and less idiomatic.
    Does it apply to all other verbs in English or is it only restricted to be verbs?
    For example:
    C1. David not only did the laundry but also went food shopping.
    C2. David did not only the laundry but also went food shopping.

    D1. They not only made the rules but also enforced them.
    D2. They made not only the rules but also enforced them.

    Are both C2 and D2 more idiomatic than C1 and D1?


    The same would be true of deleting “but” instead, although some people would tell you the comma would then need to be changed to a semicolon.
    Do you mean I can also delete but and the sentence will still be correct?
    So it's OK for me to change the sentence "Lack of sleep not only is bad for your skin and heart, but also makes you gain weight." into:
    "Lack of sleep not only is bad for your skin and heart, makes you gain weight." ?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s hard to follow your reasoning. Your C2 nd D2 examples are wrong. So is the 2nd sentence in your other example.

    The point is that although “not only … but also” is the basic correlative construction, it’s commonly used in other forms too. These, and no doubt more, are all OK:

    Lack of sleep is not only bad for your health, but also makes you gain weight.​
    Lack of sleep is not only bad for your health, it also makes you gain weight.​
    Lack of sleep is not only bad for your health, it makes you gain weight.​
    Not only is lack of sleep bad for your health, but it makes you gain weight.​
    Not only is lack of sleep bad for your health, it [also] makes you gain weight.​
     
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