Not only the crickets but also a frog chirped . . .

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El10

Senior Member
Spanish-Colombia
1. "Not only the crickets but also a frog chirped outside David's window for so long last night that it kept the poor boy from getting any rest before his important pronoun agreement quiz."
2. "Not only the handpicked flowers but also the homemade peanut butter pie will win Briana's heart with its thoughtfulness."
3. "Neither Floyd the dog nor Madison's three cats enjoy sleeping on the hard, cold floor when they can jump onto the soft, warm bed as soon as she leaves for work."

The three example sentences above start with "Not only... but also" and "Neither... nor"; however, there's no inversion using the auxiliary "do." I think that we don't use inversion in these cases because, although each sentence starts with a negative correlative conjunction, there is no verb after the first element, so both elements in the correlative conjunction share the same verb; therefore, there's no need for inversion. Is this the reason we don't use inversion in these types of sentences?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think that we don't use inversion in these cases because, although each sentence starts with a negative correlative conjunction, there is no verb after the first element, so both elements in the correlative conjunction share the same verb; therefore, there's no need for inversion. Is this the reason we don't use inversion in these types of sentences?
    :thumbsup: This makes sense. "Neither ... nor..." and "not only... but also..." are used to coordinate nouns or noun phrases in these examples.

    It's ordinary for a pair of nouns to share a verb in this type of structure. Use of an auxiliary would be strange: Neither John knows nor does Jane???:rolleyes:
     

    El10

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Colombia
    :thumbsup: This makes sense. "Neither ... nor..." and "not only... but also..." are used to coordinate nouns or noun phrases in these examples.

    It's ordinary for a pair of nouns to share a verb in this type of structure. Use of an auxiliary would be strange: Neither John knows nor does Jane???:rolleyes:
    Thank you very much.
     
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