not to be the full shilling

< Previous | Next >

chtischmo

New Member
France, French
Ahoi

What does this expression mean? to be or not to be perfect?
Do you know an equivalent idiomatic expression in French?
Thanx!!
Chlö
 
  • dewsy

    Senior Member
    England, english
    To be a bit stupid. Also, to be tuppence short of a ha'penny, not playing with a full deck of cards. Sorry I haven't got an equivalent in French, but I'm sure someone will come up with something.
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    Not fully what it should be (which is not necessarily "perfect"). I found this on google:

    "Not the full shilling at the moment. I'm tired of feeling tired! For the last couple of months I have been running well below parr and waking up tired in ..."

    Does "pas en pleine forme" convey this in French?
     

    chtischmo

    New Member
    France, French
    @ Clairet
    Yes, "pas en pleine forme" is great for your sentence's translation, but now I am afraid there's a big difference between this meaning and the one dewsy wrote, and on top of that I found "to be slightly crazy" in the Spanish-English forum... What do you think is the most widespread meaning?
    thanx
     

    totallylost202

    Senior Member
    England, English
    @ Clairet
    Yes, "pas en pleine forme" is great for your sentence's translation, but now I am afraid there's a big difference between this meaning and the one dewsy wrote, and on top of that I found "to be slightly crazy" in the Spanish-English forum... What do you think is the most widespread meaning?
    thanx
    It would be 'to be slightly crazy'.
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    I agree with the others that the most common meaning is "not all there" (for which, in turn the most common meaning is slightly crazy or stupid). However, I think there are contexts where it would mean something different. I think you can say things like "This proposed deal is not the full shilling" (not what it ought to be, as the most general form). So it depends on your context.
     

    dewsy

    Senior Member
    England, english
    Where are all our Irish friends when we need them???

    Please look here for the definition (I am maybe slightly crazy but I had an Irish flatmate for a year :D)
     

    timboleicester

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    @ Clairet
    Yes, "pas en pleine forme" is great for your sentence's translation, but now I am afraid there's a big difference between this meaning and the one dewsy wrote, and on top of that I found "to be slightly crazy" in the Spanish-English forum... What do you think is the most widespread meaning?
    thanx

    In ye olden days one had to put a "shilling" in the meter to make the electricity or gas come out. I can see why this "not the full shilling" phrase was coined. It gives the idea that one is not running at full speed or doesn't feel 100% usual.

    I agree that the usual meaning is "not to be all there" "avoir des arraignées au plafond"
     

    petit1

    Senior Member
    français - France
    Il n'a pas la lumière à tous les étages.
    That's not far from timboleicester's explanation.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top