not ugly as a wicked chicken <neither/either?>

keilah_5

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
If you wonder how I look like, let me tell you that I'm no beauty queen but not ugly as a wicked chicken either

Any mistakes?

================================
Threads merged. This is the question from the second thread. Cagey, moderator.

I'm no beauty queen and still not a relation to Frankenstein's creation neither.

Any mistakes?
 
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  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    If you wonder how I look like, let me tell you that I'm no beauty queen but not ugly as a wicked chicken either

    Any mistakes?
    neither:cross: either:tick:
    Because of the 'not' a relation, we use either for the second phrase.
    English double negatives become affirmatives.

    The other way to say it is - I'm no beauty queen; neither am I a relation...

    Edited to add question to post, after two threads were merged. Cagey, moderator.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'm no beauty queen and still not a relation to Frankenstein's creation neither.

    Any mistakes?
    <---->

    We are allowed to answer specific language questions. Is there some part of that sentence that you have a question about? The word "either" in your sentence looks perfectly normal to me.

    Edited to add question to post, for sake of clarity. Cagey, moderator
    .
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    < Explanation longer needed.>

    The answer is yes, "either" is correct.

    The point is that either and neither are negatives of each other: neither = not either. Now, in the phrase "but not ugly as a wicked chicken either" we already have a negative "not". So we don't need another negative.
     
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