not very dependable of late

Dabin

Senior Member
Korean
While reading the novel 'The Hunger Games', I encountered with unfamiliar expression 'dependable of late'

The context is this below :

Oh, well, I think. There will be twenty-four of us. Odds are someone else will kill him before I do.
Of course, the odds have not been very dependable of late.



I have learned prepositions is followed by nouns or noun phrases but how is above expression accountable?
 
  • Dabin

    Senior Member
    Korean
    'Of late' is a phrase and means 'lately'.

    Thank you. But I couldn't find the noun form of 'late' in my dictionary, so is 'of late' an idiom or slang?
    Or, is there any grammatical rule for making like above expression? If so, would you let me know about it in detail ? :)
    Again, thank you.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    There's no reason to suppose that 'late' is a noun there. I can't think of any closely similar phrases to that idiom, so we just have to accept it's unique and doesn't have an obvious grammar. Oh, here's one: 'of old' is an archaic phrase meaning "in the distance past, in olden times".
     

    Dabin

    Senior Member
    Korean
    There's no reason to suppose that 'late' is a noun there. I can't think of any closely similar phrases to that idiom, so we just have to accept it's unique and doesn't have an obvious grammar. Oh, here's one: 'of old' is an archaic phrase meaning "in the distance past, in olden times".

    So amazing that there are these expressions! So interesting to study English more and more :D Thank you !!
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Here are some more preposition + adjective idioms: for sure, for real, for free. No doubt there are a few more too.
     
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