notarizing official/notary

  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Is there any difference between a notarizing official and a notary?
    Yes, one term (notary) is part of the language and the other isn't.

    We don't use the expression much in BE, distinguishing between solicitors - who advise in general about legal matters, and draw up wills and other legal documents, and barristers - who present cases in court, advised by solicitors. The line is blurred in places.

    There is someone called a notary public, usually a solicitor with special powers, to attest to a signature on an important document, and give a sort of imprimatur if ever one is needed to show that something is genuine.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi All,

    In the US a notary [public] doesn't need to be a lawyer. I think the notary is required to have good character and is licenced (maybe) by the state.

    Well, at least I'm sure that they don't need to be a lawyer here.
     

    aefavant

    Member
    UK, English/Portuguese(Br)
    Yes, one term (notary) is part of the language and the other isn't.

    We don't use the expression much in BE, distinguishing between solicitors - who advise in general about legal matters, and draw up wills and other legal documents, and barristers - who present cases in court, advised by solicitors. The line is blurred in places.

    There is someone called a notary public, usually a solicitor with special powers, to attest to a signature on an important document, and give a sort of imprimatur if ever one is needed to show that something is genuine.
    And tell me, the notary public could be taken as the "registrar" ? May the notary just be someone from the office of registration?
    You seem to known some about Law and terms alike :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And tell me, the notary public could be taken as the "registrar" ? May the notary just be someone from the office of registration?
    You seem to known some about Law and terms alike :)
    I don't think we use the words registrar, or office of registration. Don't draw too many conclusions from my very superficial knowledge of this area. There is a more or less bewildering article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notary_public which I don't particularly recommend, but which may have the right answer to your question.
     

    Mariaguadalupe

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    As Word Lover said, in the States, a notary public does not have to be a lawyer/attorney-at-law. However, a notary public does have to be a person in good standing, which means no criminal record. Each state differs but basically they are licensed by each State. As in other parts of the world, they do have to be very careful what they attest to.

    In México, a notary public is usually an attorney-at-law (lawyer/solicitor) with special powers.
     

    aefavant

    Member
    UK, English/Portuguese(Br)
    I don't think we use the words registrar, or office of registration. Don't draw too many conclusions from my very superficial knowledge of this area. There is a more or less bewildering article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notary_public which I don't particularly recommend, but which may have the right answer to your question.
    Strange. Anyways, registrar I supposed should be quite usual (at least to me) and office of registration was just a possible expression a made
    I was just wondering if anyone could use notary or registrar the very same way.
    Thanks anyway.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In AE, no one would use registrar and notary the same way because they are not at all the same thing, or even related things.

    A registrar tends to be an official in a school who keeps track of the enrollment of students.

    A notary is any person authorized (but not employed) by the state to notarize documents -- usually, attesting to the fact that a document was in fact signed by the person whose signature the document bears.

    I have no idea what an "office of registration" might be.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Strange. Anyways, registrar I supposed should be quite usual (at least to me) and office of registration was just a possible expression a made
    I was just wondering if anyone could use notary or registrar the very same way.
    Thanks anyway.
    I meant registrar in this context. We have various sorts of registrar - people with whom something has to be registered - like the Registrar of Restrictive Practices, for instance, until his functions were taken over by the Director General of Fair Trading.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It all depends, evidently on where you are.
    Thomas T has explained the position in the UK.

    Here is a bit more ...
    In the UK, a "Notary is a qualified lawyer – a member of the third and oldest branch of the legal profession in the United Kingdom. He is appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury ...".
    For more about UK notaries (also known as notaries public) CLICK HERE.

    There are many different kinds of registrar, none of them as far as I know related to the notary.
    Discussion of registrars is of course off topic for this thread.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Just an added bit of context. Up until the 1950's, before you sent in your tax forms to the IRS, you need to get it "notarized" by a "notary public".

    Being a notary public back then could be quite lucrative, especially at tax time. Notary's would charge for this work and it was fast and easy work.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In case you are not aware of it, there are fifty states in the United States. Each state has its own rules regarding the notarizing of documents. Florida is just one state out of fifty. One out of fifty is not a majority, is it? It might also be well to keep in mind that Florida has a large Spanish-speaking population who might completely misunderstand what is meant by a "notary" in the United States, and might think that a "notary" and a notario are the same thing.

    What I understand the instructions to mean is that the State of Florida allows not only notaries to notarize this form, but also gives that authority to other designated officials as well, and that the form must be signed in the presence of any person empowered by the state to notarize this particular form. The fact that Florida allows a number of people other than notaries public to notarize a particular form does not in any way make "notarizing official" a commonly used phrase. I therefore repeat what I said earlier: In the United States, we commonly use the term "notary", while we do not commonly use the term "notarizing official".
     
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