Notebook, homework book, copy book

Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Good morning,

In schools, teachers assign homework to the children (e.g. students are asked to write any 20 verbs with their meanings as a homework). Usually mothers help their children out with their homework. Children do their homework on this sort of ______________.
I wonder what to call this.
-Notebook
-Copy
-Copybook
-Homework book (or work book)

<Second question removed. Nat, moderator>

Thanks very much.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It depends on the size. If it is A5 size (about 6" x 8") or bigger, it would be an exercise book. Anything smaller is a notebook. At school we used to have a 'homework notebook' for us to jot down all our homework.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    At school we used to have a 'homework notebook' for us to jot down all our homework
    You mean to say that this special notebook was owned by teachers only who noted down all what they gave their students as homework?
    Do the teachers still own this notebook in the UK?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You mean to say that this special notebook was owned by teachers only who noted down all what they gave their students as homework?
    Do the teachers still own this notebook in the UK?
    No, these homework notebooks were owned by pupils. We copied down the assigned homework from the blackboard into our homework notebooks. At one stage we had to get our parents to sign off the homework notebooks to confirm that the homework had been done.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    No, these homework notebooks were owned by pupils. We copied down the assigned homework from the blackboard into our homework notebooks. At one stage we had to get our parents to sign off the homework notebooks to confirm that the homework had been done.
    So I think it's exactly what I was referring to in the OP?

    And...you used past tense that gives me an idea that UK teachers no longer assign their students homework now. Right?
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    In India, a note book and a exercise book mean the same.

    Shopkeeper: Do you want long or short.

    Customer: long.

    Shopkeeper: Plain or line, double line or single line. Tell.

    Shopkeeper will first show the most expensive one which as big as a register book.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The homework is not done in the small homework notebook, which was used to note down what the homework is.
    "French: Learn vocabulary in Chapter 7, for Friday".
    "English: essay for next week The Worst Day of My Life.
    That's what the teacher would write on the blackboard and we'd copy into the homework notebook.
    The work would be done in lined exercise books until the last two years.
    We also had 'rough' books' which we used for preparatory work.
    My experience of modern schooling is very limited. Our granddaughter in primary school a few years ago had work-sheets for homework and folders to store their work in.
    They used computers for continuous writing.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, that echoes my experience too. The homework itself was done in exercise books, not the homework notebook.

    When my children went to school, they were also called jotter books.

    Most of the time, they were given A4 size worksheets, or work to be done on the computer.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    you used past tense that gives me an idea that UK teachers no longer assign their students homework now.
    I'm sure UK schoolteachers still assign students homework. He used past tense because his schooldays are in the past. By your logic, Julian Stuart's statement in #3: "Growing up in the 60s, we called that an exercise book", would mean people don't grow up anymore.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's possible that English school children have far more homework these days than we had 65/70 years ago.
    Neither my husband or I can recall getting any homework, in primary school, (4/5-10/11) not even 'spelling'.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top