Nothing is more relaxing than to sit in the quietness....

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I’m trying to put a sentence in Japanese into English. The following are what I have made.
1. Nothing is more relaxing than sitting in the quietness in a tea room.
2. Nothing is more relaxing than to sit in the quietness in a tea room.

I wrote #1, but now I’m wondering if #2 is OK, too. Is #2 correct and natural English?
 
  • Rugby Prop

    New Member
    English -- USA
    1. Nothing is more relaxing than sitting quietly in a tea room.
    2. Nothing is more relaxing than to sit in the quietness of a tea room.


    #1 refers to the quiet, zazen-like sitting that one does in a tea room.
    #2 refers to the quiet, zen-like quality of a tea room. Personally in #2, I'd use:

    Nothing is more relaxing than sitting in the quietness of a tea room, but the infinitive is certainly more formal, if that's what you're after.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you for your help, Rugby Prop.

    Could you help me a little further?
    How about #3 or #4 below?

    3. Nothing is more relaxing than sitting in the quietness in the tea room.
    4. Nothing is more relaxing than to sit in the quietness in the tea room.


    I would like #3 and #4 to be a general statement. But does "the tea room" in #3 an #4 mean a specific, definite tea room, not a genral, indefinite one?
     

    Mrs Coddlesangers

    New Member
    English-Ireland
    Thank you for your help, Rugby Prop.

    Could you help me a little further?
    How about #3 or #4 below?

    3. Nothing is more relaxing than sitting in the quietness in the tea room.
    4. Nothing is more relaxing than to sit in the quietness in the tea room.

    I would like #3 and #4 to be a general statement. But does "the tea room" in #3 an #4 mean a specific, definite tea room, not a genral, indefinite one?
    I would say 'the' means that you are talking of a specific tea room

    You need to say either:
    a) sitting/to sit in the quietness of the tea room
    b) sitting/to sit in quietness in the tea room

    a) means the tea room was quiet
    b) means you were quiet.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    To me, to sit refers to the abstract notion one has when considering whether to sit, but sitting refers to the action itself or to the state one is in when seated.

    "The tea room" here could be either general or specific, depending on context.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you for your reply, Forero.
    "The tea room" here could be either general or specific, depending on context.
    Let me make sure what you mean.
    The sentence is stand-alone, without any context. Even so, can "the tea room" be interpreted as generic use, not specific?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Thank you for your reply, Forero.


    Let me make sure what you mean.
    The sentence is stand-alone, without any context. Even so, can "the tea room" be interpreted as generic use, not specific?
    That is right. But I would probably not use two "in the"s so close together:

    ... in the quietness of the tea room.
    ... in quietness in the tea room.
    .. in the quietness of a tea room.

     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Quiet is nice, short alternative, but just a bit more descriptive than the atmospheric quietness that gives me that languid feeling of being quiet and at peace. Quietness sounds a little more Zen-like and I like it for the same reasons I like darkness or peacefulness, or even sadness or restlessness. They are states of being rather than descriptions of being. Well, for me. :)
     
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