Nothing serious, just a scrape/graze/abrasion

Eric Chengdu

Senior Member
Chinese
I fell and skinned my knee, and then my freinds came up to me and asked if I was alright. and I said,

Nothing serious, just a graze.
Nothing serious, just a scrape.
Nothing serious, just an abrasion.

I just wonder if they all mean the same thing and are all commonly used in daily speech. Thanks
 
  • Eric Chengdu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In BE, the first is used in everyday speech.

    Do you fall over every day? ;)
    Thank you. haha...I'm afraid my skin was not thick enough for that frequency :D . By the way, i thought "scrape" was more commonly used than "graze".
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with andygc, 'graze' is very common in BE. I don't think we would say 'scrape' in this context.

    A doctor or nurse might describe it as an abrasion, but the sufferer in your context is not likely to.
     

    Eric Chengdu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I agree with andygc, 'graze' is very common in BE. I don't think we would say 'scrape' in this context.

    A doctor or nurse might describe it as an abrasion, but the sufferer in your context is not likely to.
    Thank you. How about using "scrape" and "graze" as verbs? it's still not likely to use "scrape" in this context in BE?

    I fell and scraped my knee.
    I fell and grazed my knee.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In American English I would expect to hear (colloquially):

    Are you OK?
    It's nothing. Just a scratch.


    (We do use "scrape" in this context, but to keep with the idea of minimizing the severity of the injury, "scratch" is more effective.)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Scrape is very common in the U.S.

    I would call a scrape a more significant injury than a graze (although still minimal).

    To me that's a scrape:
    33636


    And that's a graze.
    33637
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Scrape is very common in the U.S.

    I would call a scrape a more significant injury than a graze (although still minimal).

    To me that's a scrape:
    View attachment 33636

    And that's a graze.
    View attachment 33637
    I agree. I would say that a scrape would show the appearance of blood without any blood flow.

    "Road rash" would be the worst example of a scrape and would likely be a seriously painful, but not a seriously life threatening "scrape". Road rash is typically a cyclist's injury where he/she travels a significant distance in contact with the paved roadway, thus "scraping" a large area of skin.

    A "scratch" would be a very small and inconsequential "graze".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I don't often think of "graze" as a noun.
    The Google Ngram Viewer shows that—even in British English—"a scrape" is more frequent than "a graze".
    Also, "graze" is used to describe potentially lethal injuries.

    Cop shot in shootout with bank robbers: I'm hit!
    Fellow cop: Bad?
    Shot cop: No. Just grazed me. Hurts though.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I don't often think of "graze" as a noun.
    The Google Ngram Viewer shows that—even in British English—"a scrape" is more frequent than "a graze".
    I never trust Google Ngram's division between BrE and AmE. When you look at individual hits, the division is decidedly suspect.
     
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