nothing that free-enterprise does serves as a "wonderful motivation"...

ironman2012

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

A "tragic misallocation of resources" is also to blame for the poor state of health in many countries, said Gates. He calls the neglect of certain populations a "failure of capitalism", nothing that free-enterprise does serves as a "wonderful motivation" for people, on a global scale, it has let many others down.

(This comes from my English study book and I don't find its origin.)

What does the blue part mean? Does it mean "on a global scale free-enterprise (an economic doctrine) does nothing that motivates people, it has disappointed many other people"?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    In addition to the misspelling noted by lingobingo, something is missing.
    (Also: either "serves" or "does serve")

    He calls the neglect of certain populations a "failure of capitalism", noting that [while? although?] free-enterprise does serve as a "wonderful motivation" for people, on a global scale, it has let many others down.
     

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In addition to the misspelling noted by lingobingo, something is missing.
    (Also: either "serves" or "does serve")
    I have double-checked my textbook and it is "nothing that free-enterprise does serves as a "wonderful motivation" for people,".
    He calls the neglect of certain populations a "failure of capitalism", noting that [while? although?] free-enterprise does serve as a "wonderful motivation" for people, on a global scale, it has let many others down.
    Thank you for your correction. I didn't realize that the text was misspelled.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There seems to be a misreading here. It’s correct as it stands.

    {nothing that free-enterprise does} serves as a "wonderful motivation" for people, on a global scale … :tick:
    =​
    … there is nothing done by free-enterprise that serves as …
     
    Last edited:

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    nothing that free-enterprise does serves as a "wonderful motivation" for people, on a global scale … :tick:
    Does "for" mean "used to show who is intended to have or use something or where something is intended to be put", as in "It's a book for children"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s a normal use of the preposition.

    It serves as a motivation for people to [do whatever]
    It provides the motivation for them to do that
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    :thumbsup: to lingobingo for getting the reading straight.

    The difficulty may come from the punctuation of the text. Ironman, is the text in #1 exactly like that in your book?
     
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