nothing to get hung about

nicko

Senior Member
France, French, English, Spanish
Hello.

I am trying to understand the lyrics if the Beatles's song "Strawberry Fields Forever":

"Let me take you down cause I'm going to Strawberry Fields
Nothing is real
And nothing to get hung about
Strawberry Fields forever"

In one of his interviews, J. Lennon explained that "Strawberry Fields" is the name of a building owned by the Salvation Army, near the street where he lived when he was a child. Near this building, there were strawberry fields, where the children enjoyed spending time. He said that this song (though many people say it means nothing) refers to his childhood, the time when he was happier and when life seemed easier for him. So, it seems to me this song is the story of a man who wants to flee away from the present and to get back to his childhood ("I'm going to Strawberry Fields"), and he's talking to a person he wants to go with in this ideal world("Let me take you down").

But I don't understand what "nothing to get hung about" means, if it means anything. Can somebody (especially the English-speaking persons) help me? Thank you.
 
  • Rob G

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi nicko,

    I suspect this is a contraction of the expression "to get hung up about something" - meaning to worry about something. So in this ideal place described in the song, there is nothing to give you any reason or excuse for worry or stress.
     

    hibouette

    Senior Member
    France and French
    hang about = wait, waste time
    nothing to get hung about = "rien ne nous y attends" (dans le sens où il y est tranquille, personne ne va lui tomber dessus) ou "rien ne fait perdre du temps"(rien n'est inutile)

    Je dirais "on ne peut rien y perdre" pour combiner les deux
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Rob G said:
    Hi nicko, I suspect this is a contraction of the expression "to get hung up about something" - meaning to worry about something. So in this ideal place described in the song, there is nothing to give you any reason or excuse for worry or stress.
    I agree, Rob, this is the interpretation I have always put on the line.

    Alternatively, 'get hung' might I suppose, refer to getting hung / hanged as a means of judicial execution. There is nothing to get hung about = there is nothing about which to get hung = there is no reason to take any drastic action that might result in you getting hanged!

    I don't think it has anything to do with 'hang about' meaning 'do nothing' or 'wait', because 'hang about' is intransive, and it doesn't make sense to put it in the passive.

    My understanding was that 'Strawberry Fields' celebrated an orphanage of that name in Liverpool.
    http://beatles.ncf.ca/strawberry_fields_orphanage_closes.html
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-12-strawberry-fields_x.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strawberry_Field
     

    Celador

    Senior Member
    English / Scotland
    I'd concur with <hung up about>, unless its Liverpudlian slang for something else - but the Beetles tended not to sing in their local dialect.

    Pop singers often drop words for the sake of rhythm.
     

    Celador

    Senior Member
    English / Scotland
    mapping said:
    Nothing to get hung about. Moi je voyais plutôt ça comme il n'y a pas de quoi fouetter un chat, non ?

    Exactement (mais laisses ces chats tranquilles, toi !)...
     

    Maroussia

    Member
    French /New Caledonia
    mapping said:
    Nothing to get hung about. Moi je voyais plutôt ça comme il n'y a pas de quoi fouetter un chat, non ?

    So was I, "pas de quoi faire un fromage"


    Maroussia (dreaming of decent "stinking" cheese 22 000 km away from France......)
     

    Sangriabuena

    Senior Member
    swedish
    Yeah it's "nothing to get upset about" unless he was refering to something different, after all artists liberty and all. As for "let me take you down" it's come with me down to strawberry fields, let me take you there" again it can be viewed differently. One girl always thought it meant "let me take you down" as something she could relate to being depressed. Anyway I'm rambling
    Love ya John
     

    Bormer

    Member
    Italian
    Well I wondered it myself, and I found out in wikipedia the following:

    The first verse on the released version was the last to be written, close to the time of the song's recording. For the refrain, Lennon was again inspired by his childhood memories: the words "nothing to get hung about" were inspired by Aunt Mimi's strict order not to play in the grounds of Strawberry Field, to which Lennon replied, "They can't hang you for it."[23] The first verse Lennon wrote became the second in the released version, and the second verse Lennon wrote became the last in the release.

    Mistery unveiled.
     

    danscot

    Member
    français
    Thank you all for solving the mystery. A denial of interdiction from young John Lennon ? :)
    "Jouer dans les plantations de fraises n'est pas un coup pendable!" (on risque pas la peine de mort)
     

    oliver63

    New Member
    Italian
    Well I wondered it myself, and I found out in wikipedia the following:

    The first verse on the released version was the last to be written, close to the time of the song's recording. For the refrain, Lennon was again inspired by his childhood memories: the words "nothing to get hung about" were inspired by Aunt Mimi's strict order not to play in the grounds of Strawberry Field, to which Lennon replied, "They can't hang you for it."[23] The first verse Lennon wrote became the second in the released version, and the second verse Lennon wrote became the last in the release.

    Mistery unveiled.

    Love this !!! So it adds a taste of sweetness to all the telling ... It's a lovely memory of his aunt ... :) Thank you so much !!!
     
    Top