noun in which to rely on

parmesan

New Member
Japanese
Hi :)

I came across that kind of form. I googled and could identify the similar structures below.




1. Things quickly closed in around the Captain and the 100 men who had only a stick built fort in which to rely on for protection.

2. the military could not fight the cartels alone and needed cops in which to rely on for patrolling

3. What if parents have an app in which to rely on, ..

4. The English People’s Party aims to significantly improve the lives of our elderly by delivering a sense of value, respect and decent income in which to live on.

5. It doesn't mean you must have a counter part
in which to be dependent upon





I could find much more various examples like them.
Why aren't they just written in a simple way, such as ..




1. a stick built fort in which to rely on => a stick built fort to rely on

4.. decent income in which to live on. => decent income to live on

5. a counter part
in which to be dependent upon => a counter part to be dependent upon



I guessed that those speakers' intention might have wanted to express "something to do 'in there'".
Which effect are they aimed at?
Thanks in advance!!



 
Last edited:
  • chfattouma

    Senior Member
    Tunisian Arabic
    Hi parmesan. Welcome to the forum.:)
    One of the forum rules is to acknowledge your source. I think yours are examples of poor English or bad translations . We could provide more explanation if you state your source(s).:)
     

    parmesan

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you forchfattouma!

    I tried posting their links but got a message that new members are not allowed to post links!

    Is there any other way to put links?
     

    parmesan

    New Member
    Japanese
    I brought in all of the examples from Google. You can find them by searching the sentences on Google.

    I'm sorry to bother you...
     

    chfattouma

    Senior Member
    Tunisian Arabic
    In this case I will use one of the sentences in the OP to explain the point.
    1. Things quickly closed in around the Captain and the 100 men who had only a stick-built fort in whichto rely on for protection.
    We could paraphrase the last part of the sentence as follows:
    "They relied on a stick-built fort for protection.
    Here, and in the rest of the examples in the OP, the insertion of 'in which' is ungrammatical.

    The use of "in which" will be correct in a sentence like the following (indicating place)
    This is the drawer in which I left my jewelry. = I left my jewelry in this drawer.

    Note that 'in which' could be replaced with 'where' in the last sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    We don't require links, but we do require that you name your source; Give the name of the website and tell us something about the type of website it is. Also tell us whether these are from reader's comments or part of the edited text.

    You should also reduce the number of examples to one or two. It is too confusing to try to discuss so many examples in one thread.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I will tell you briefly, though, that "in which to rely on" is simply wrong, no matter where you found it. We do not rely in things; instead, we rely on things . Beyond that, and in connection with your other examples, it is incorrect to try to construct a sentence using two pronouns with the same object -- which is what you have given us here.
     
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