noun of impel

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F1Z

Senior Member
Arabic
I'm looking for the noun of 'impel'. Is the word impellment real? I do not have any context, but since you are not psychic here you are some of the very few google results:

"Gravitation in terms of rhysmonic theory will be only briefly summarized here. In essence, the instantaneous rhysmonic vectors ‘exist’ universe wide for the interval of Planck Time, T*, and thus are effectively ‘action at a distance’ in this time period. Gravitation in rhysmonic theory is the result of the ‘screening’ action between masses in the universe. The force of gravitation is found to be actually a force of ‘impellment’ between the masses rather than a force of ‘attraction’ between the masses."

"Do you really think that this historic pattern of mankind's renaissance-creating, self-impellment will no longer continue?" (more context)
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    F1Z, you have proved that the word is real because you have found examples of its use, apparently in respectable publications.

    However, this does not mean that anyone will understand the word if you use it. Who is your intended audience?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    One technique I use to decide if a word exists is to put in into OneLook.com ... when you do this with "impellment," you get no results.

    I would suggest that your first source uses the quotation marks because the author knows it's not a word, but he or she figures that it is useful under the circumstances and that people will understand the intention. The second source uses the "word" without this nicety.
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The Shorter OED has no entry for "impellment", and I think your author(s) made it up. The authentic noun derived from impel is impulsion​.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are often several nouns associated with a verb. Off the top of my head I can think of impulse, impulsion, impeller and impellent. What do you want your noun to mean?
    I've never heard of 'impellment' (which is not to say that it doesn't exist) - I note that a number of words in your OP are surrounded by quotation marks; I'm not sure why.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Due to the invalidity of the term "Clash of Civilizations", Dr. Bufalja Ghiat and other Arab academics introduced a milder more comprehensive concept that encompasses various levels of interaction between civilizations, ranging from inter-cultural dialogue to actual clash. After looking up the dictionaries for a noun, the closest English word I found was impel. I thought his concept can be called cultural impellment or impulsion. It means that a process of perpetual 'impellment' back and forth results in endless forms of interaction that cannot be limited to clash. Please tell me what you think.
     

    HasuMoo

    Member
    Dutch - Netherlands
    I would judge from your context that 'to impel' is the opposite of 'to repel', just as 'to imply' is the opposite of 'to reply'.

    Going from this context I would assume the noun you are looking for is 'impellence', the opposite of the noun 'repellence'.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would judge from your context that 'to impel' is the opposite of 'to repel', just as 'to imply' is the opposite of 'to reply'.

    Going from this context I would assume the noun you are looking for is 'impellence', the opposite of the noun 'repellence'.
    If you follow my advice in post 3, you'll find no results for impellence, either.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Hmm. Perhaps the association of 'churn' with the making of butter may render the word improper for an academic concept, or is it OK?
     

    HasuMoo

    Member
    Dutch - Netherlands
    You are right, it does sound like a meta-scientific word made up to convey the author's message.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I would judge from your context that 'to impel' is the opposite of 'to repel', just as 'to imply' is the opposite of 'to reply'.

    Going from this context I would assume the noun you are looking for is 'impellence', the opposite of the noun 'repellence'.
    I thought they were almost the same, repel and impel.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I'm surprised how the Quranic word on which the academics based their concept and term is translated mainly as 'repel'. I have just checked it out, see verse 2: 251 and 22: 40. Please explain the diffidence between repel and impel in the context I have provided.
     

    HasuMoo

    Member
    Dutch - Netherlands
    You are right. I only tried to apply logic to help you find a noun that might suit your needs.

    As with many Arabic words, it is hard to translate them correctly into academic writing, as the author shows with the ample use of apostrophes in this small excerpt. Just stick with the accepted academic language or use a metaphor with a footnote explaining your choice for English readers.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    There are several verbs derived from the same original Latin root 'pello' which means 'strike' or 'knock', with the sense of making a thing move. English derivatives include: compel, dispel, expel, impel, propel, repel. There are various nouns derived from those verbs, all with different meanings and nuances, which can be seen in dictionaries.

    Considering the original query,
    a force of ‘impellment’ between the masses rather than a force of ‘attraction’ between the masses.
    the opposite of 'attraction' is 'repulsion'. That means 'driving away'. If the sense required is simply 'driving by force', then the word is 'impulsion' or 'compulsion'.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm surprised how the Quranic word on which the academics based their concept and term is translated mainly as 'repel'. I have just checked it out, see verse 2: 251 and 22: 40. Please explain the diffidence between repel and impel in the context I have provided.
    You have only provided links, not context. While we appreciate links, they can break over time, making them useless. Please quote or tell us the context, remembering our rule about four sentences of quotation. If that is not enough, you will need to paraphrase. Thank you.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Ok Thanks. One of the verses says "Those who have been expelled from their homes without a just cause except that they say: Our Lord is Allah. And had there not been Allah's repelling some people by others, certainly there would have been pulled down cloisters and churches and synagogues and mosques in which Allah's name is much remembered; and surely Allah will help him who helps His cause; most surely Allah is Strong, Mighty."

    The other verse has a similar idea, if various groups of people are not enabled by Allah to repel or impel one another, definitely each group will try to destroy the others. My term is derived from these verses. This back and forth inter-cultural movement is better described in your opinions, as 'cultural impellment; impulsion; repellence, ' or something else?
     
    Last edited:

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I am not posing it here as a translation question. What I'm looking for is a proper term for the concept I have explained in post 6. I thought we could come up with something good out of the word 'impel' or any close word. I actually saw this thread in the Arabic forum about something close but not identical to what I have explained, but could not find what I needed. Sorry for exhausting you guys :)
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The word 'action' has a counterpart 'interaction', which means 'mutual action and reaction'.
    'Change' or 'exchange' has the similar counterpart 'interchange', meaning 'mutual exchange'.

    'The interaction of the two cultures generated a fertile interchange of ideas.'

    The verb 'impel' has nouns 'impulse' and 'implulsion', but neither of these has a form with 'inter-'.

    Therefore I suggest you should either use 'interaction' or 'interchange' or else use a phrase such as 'the impulse and counter-impulse of cultures'.
     

    F1Z

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Ok Thanks. Wandle, it is a term and has to be some how short. Do you think it can be 'cultural impulse' only? Can we say for example, "After the Reconquesta the role the Islamic civilization had in the cultural impulse that took place between the west and the orient started to diminish." "Cultural impulse is an alternative to cultural clash."
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hmm. Perhaps the association of 'churn' with the making of butter may render the word improper for an academic concept, or is it OK?
    No, I don't think that its buttery associations render it improper - the oceans churns the seabed is more what I had in mind.

    Whether it's right or not, is another matter - this depends on whether it fits the context that you have in mind. It's not clear as yet (to me at least), that anyone here has fully understood what this context is - That is, I'm not sure that we know what you're trying to say.
     
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