noun or verb: 'remarkable indictment' vs 'remarkably condemned'

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snooprun

Senior Member
Chinese
In this sentence "The paper that emerged was a remarkable indictment of the elaborate architecture that grew up over the decades since the Wall Street crash."

Can we say it like this "The paper that emerged remarkably condemned the elaborate architecture that grew up over the decades since the Wall Street crash. "

Which one sounds more nature for native speakers? And when should we use the "noun forms" or "verb forms" of verbs,as the sentenceas above. What are their differences?
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, you can. Language is flexible. Generally we prefer to use verbal constructions, but it's all a matter of style.
     

    snooprun

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, you can. Language is flexible. Generally we prefer to use verbal constructions, but it's all a matter of style.
    Is it a requirment of variety of style? Does it sound natural to use several verbal constructions consecutively?
     
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