"nounA nounB" or "nounB in nounA"

Dimitri Lee

Member
Chinese, Taiwan
Hello everyone.

"TV shows" : "shows in TV"

What's the difference between them? I have googled them and some other things like "supreme court cases", "grammar mistakes", "nounA nounB" always outnumbers. Why people tend to use it? Is there any case that "nounB in nounA" is prefered? Is "nounB in nounA" more formal?


Thanks
 
  • bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Dimitri Lee said:
    "TV shows" : "shows in TV"

    What's the difference between them? I have googled them and some other things like "supreme court cases", "grammar mistakes", "nounA nounB" always outnumbers. Why people tend to use it? Is there any case that "nounB in nounA" is prefered? Is "nounB in nounA" more formal?


    Thanks

    "TV shows" and "shows on TV" are both used. Noun compounding (as in TV show) is very common in English and has been for a few centuries. Other examples are computer screen, court case, grammar mistake, stock market, eye disease, sign writer, language forum, and mathematics teacher. Formality is not relevant to noun compounding.
     

    adán

    Member
    English, USA (California)
    I'm not quite sure how to answer your question. As a native I can tell you that you would hear someone say TV shows much more often than shows in (which as I've heard show actually be "ON") TV. In thinking about what order english places nouns in sentances the best I can come up with is we place the subject of "nounB" (as you put it) before it. For example a Horse Saddle or an envelope stamp. hope this helps
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    In addition to the above:
    "TV shows" are only seen on tv.
    "Radio shows" are heard on the radio (or on-line).
    "Webcasts" can be broadcast on-line.
    For 'TV shows' - 'TV' is like an adjective; for 'shows on tv', 'tv' is where you'll see this show (as opposed to hearing them on the radio or seeing them in a webcast).
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    french4beth said:
    In addition to the above:
    For 'TV shows' - 'TV' is like an adjective; for 'shows on tv', 'tv' is where you'll see this show (as opposed to hearing them on the radio or seeing them in a webcast).

    EXACTLY: In this case, the noun becomes an ADJECTIVE.

    House paint - paint used on houses
    house shoes - shows worn indoors
    house fly - flyes found in houses

    We can do this with almost ANY combination of nouns.
     
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