nowadays, I am working /work

boggiee

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello,

A: Are you busy?

B: Yes, nowadays, I am working all night.
B: Yes, nowadays, I work all night.

Is it OK to construct such a sentence with present cont. or must I use simple present?

Thanks.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Nowadays" is declining in popularity. It sounds a bit old-fashioned or "folksy" to this American English speaker. It also sounds humorous to me in this sentence in which you are specifically talking about what you do at night.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Here is a useful thread on "nowadays". I used that very word in a thread today, and wasn't aware that some people think it old-fashioned. It seems opinions are divided, but it's quite a useful word for informal use.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I agree with Myridon. "Nowadays" is nearly the equivalent (in AE) of saying "in these modern days..." I would only use it in a sentence comparing some historical practice or belief with its current equivalent.

    In boggiee's examples, I would be likely to use "at the moment," or "right now." In a more formal setting, I would use "currently."
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In boggiee's examples, I would be likely to use "at the moment," or "right now." In a more formal setting, I would use "currently."
    I think boggiee's examples we are dealing with a relatively long period which could range from a week to several months. Would it still be OK to use "at the moment," or "right now." to convey the same idea?

    A: Are you busy?

    B: Yes, I am working all night at the moment/right now.
    B: Yes, I work all night at the moment/right now.

    Can they (at the moment/right now) be used instead of "these days?"
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't know what exactly the OP example means so I find it hard to talk about it. I suspect a basic error. There's no context either.

    However, 'these days' is not necessarily the same as 'at the moment' or 'right now'. Speech is an expression of thought and thought arises from circumstances. It would be easy to say they are interchangeable, but I doubt that's always true.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I don't know what exactly the OP example means so I find it hard to talk about it. I suspect a basic error. There's no context either.

    However, 'these days' is not necessarily the same as 'at the moment' or 'right now'. Speech is an expression of thought and thought arises from circumstances. It would be easy to say they are interchangeable, but I doubt that's always true.
    I don't say that "these days" mean "at the moment' or 'right now'". I say that "nowadays" means "these days", hence "at the moment" MUST mean "these days".
    I suppose Florentia52 meant that if we switch "nowadays" with "at the moment" or "right now" we will remain the original meaning?

    To me, the context is clear. A person says that they have been busy and are going to be busy at nights due to their work. That's why

    I am working all night these days. (sounds best to me)
    I work all night these days. (sounds not right to me)

    I am working all night at the moment. (sounds wrong to me)
    I work all night at the moment. (sounds even more wrong)

    I am working all night right now. (maybe correct)
    I work all night right now. (maybe correct)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'All night' simply means 'throughout the night'. It does not mean 'every night', 'nights' or 'at nights', (whatever that's supposed to mean!).
    This phrase 'all night' is the crux of my difficulty with the OP.

    What does 'working all night' have to do with 'being busy'?
    'These days', 'nowadays', suggest something has changed from what it was, and the change is long-term, even perhaps permanent. We don't have this information in the OP dialogue, which really is obscure, at least to this native speaker.
    I would have to ask the speaker what he meant. Anyway, I would not have asked that vague initial question!
    I say that "nowadays" means "these days", hence "at the moment" MUST mean "these days

    [Side comments removed. DonnyB - moderator]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In another thread I was advised that "nowadays" is "old fashioned". I just looked up the word in seven online dictionaries and not one of them listed this as archaic or dated.

    Is this word out of fashion at this time? Is it dated?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In another thread I was advised that "nowadays" is "old fashioned". I just looked up the word in seven online dictionaries and not one of them listed this as archaic or dated.

    Is this word out of fashion at this time? Is it dated?
    No, I don't think the word "nowadays" is at all old-fashioned.

    The problem I have with it in the OP's context here is that it suggests a contrast with what used to happen in the past, years ago, and I suspect that isn't the scenario that 'I'm currently working nights' is intended to depict.
     
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