Numbers (724148)

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marpengal

Member
Spanish - Spain
Hello,

I'm a newbie learning Korean (self-study). I've started with the basic: alphabet, pronouns, numbers (sino and traditional system). I try to read everyday to practice and get more fluent even when I cannot understand most of the words.
Sometimes I use song lyrics to practice, and I found the song 724148 (치리사일사팔).

I'm a beginner, and I learnt the sino-system as:

7-
2 -
4 -

...

However, numbers 7 and 2 are written as 치리 in the title, when I would write them like: 사일사팔

I guess there is a rule I still don't know that explains this.
Could you please shed some light on this question?

Thank you so much.
 
  • pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello marpengal,
    Just as in English and Spanish, how syllables are written and how they are pronounced do not necessarily agree with each other all the time. In this case, the final consonant of 칠, ㄹ and the initial consonant of 이, ㅇ gets linked (it is kind of similar to the idea of liaison in French), and that is why it sounds like 치리. Of course stressing each syllable is fine, and in some situations will allow much clearer communication. Here are some other example: 발아 [바라/bara] (se traduce como brote); 갈아입다[가라입따/garaipda]; 살얼음[사러름/sareoreom]. The last word (que significa hielo delgado) is a good example of how this rule eases things in terms of pronunciation since trying to stress every single syllable can be rather challenging. Think of the word "llorando", you wouldn't pronounce the consonant "ll" and the vowel "o" separately or pause in between. Though technically different, the logic behind it is the same: to make it easier and smoother for people to pronounce words. As for different Korean words and their pronunciations, check out wiktionary.com; it's pretty comprehensive and detailed. Hope this helps.
     

    marpengal

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hello marpengal,
    Just as in English and Spanish, how syllables are written and how they are pronounced do not necessarily agree with each other all the time. In this case, the final consonant of 칠, ㄹ and the initial consonant of 이, ㅇ gets linked (it is kind of similar to the idea of liaison in French), and that is why it sounds like 치리. Of course stressing each syllable is fine, and in some situations will allow much clearer communication. Here are some other example: 발아 [바라/bara] (se traduce como brote); 갈아입다[가라입따/garaipda]; 살얼음[사러름/sareoreom]. The last word (que significa hielo delgado) is a good example of how this rule eases things in terms of pronunciation since trying to stress every single syllable can be rather challenging. Think of the word "llorando", you wouldn't pronounce the consonant "ll" and the vowel "o" separately or pause in between. Though technically different, the logic behind it is the same: to make it easier and smoother for people to pronounce words. As for different Korean words and their pronunciations, check out wiktionary.com; it's pretty comprehensive and detailed. Hope this helps.
    Thank you so much pcy0308. The first thing I thought when I saw the title was: 'Oh, ok, maybe is kinda a liason, as in French'.
    Now I fully understand.
    However, is it gramatically correct? I mean, is it correct to name these two numbers like in the example when they are written together?

    감사합니다.
     

    pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello marpengal,
    As for how it should be spelled out, you would not normally write them out like how you'd pronounce it unless you'd like to stylize it to make it sound humorous, "cool", or for the sake of whatever intention you may have. I.e. writing 724148 as "치리사일사팔" is not correct spelling-wise. Safe to assume, the artist did so with the intention of stylizing the song, more effectively grabbing potential listeners' attention, etc. Hope this helps.
     
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