O Caesar, adfectorum et petri factus es

fishvanda

Member
Hungarian
Hey Guys,

I'd like to ask your help with this quote: "O Caesar, adfectorum et petri factus es."

It is from an episode of Jamestown (205), a period drama set in the 1600s America. I cannot find this quote anywhere on the web, it might be misspelled, I don't know. Could you possibly point me in the right direction as to which play/story/hymn/etc. is this from? (My guess was Julius Caesar by Shakespeare, but this quote is not in the play itself.)

Thank you so much!

Source: Jamestown, 205, period drama, Carnival
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings

    As the text stands, little sense can be made of it, nor is it an immediately obvious quotation from anywhere. I am prepared to be shot down in flames by someone more learned, but if this is from a TV drama, I'd hazard a guess that it is pseudo-Latin, cobbled together by someone who half-remembers the Latin he/she learned at high school.

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    Snodv

    Senior Member
    English - Mid-Southern US
    I cannot pretend to be more learned than Scholiast, but I may be able to guess (partially) what was intended. Does the context indicate that someone is stern or heartless? I think this might be an attempt at "O Caesar, you were made of [??] and stone." I can't make any sense of the genitive plural adfectorum, although it is a word. And unfortunately the genitive petri (if indeed it intends "of stone") is the wrong gender and the wrong specific meaning: a rock or a crag, not the general material. Even if it were , the genitive is not good Latin; there is in classical Latin an Ablative of Material with ex and in late Latin without the ex, so we should expect e saxo (or lapide) or just saxo factus es.
    If I'm wrong, it's entirely on me; if I'm right, it's due to years of encountering bad student Latin!
     

    fishvanda

    Member
    Hungarian
    I cannot pretend to be more learned than Scholiast, but I may be able to guess (partially) what was intended. Does the context indicate that someone is stern or heartless? I think this might be an attempt at "O Caesar, you were made of [??] and stone." I can't make any sense of the genitive plural adfectorum, although it is a word. And unfortunately the genitive petri (if indeed it intends "of stone") is the wrong gender and the wrong specific meaning: a rock or a crag, not the general material. Even if it were , the genitive is not good Latin; there is in classical Latin an Ablative of Material with ex and in late Latin without the ex, so we should expect e saxo (or lapide) or just saxo factus es.
    If I'm wrong, it's entirely on me; if I'm right, it's due to years of encountering bad student Latin!
    Hm, yeah, that kind of makes sense, I can go somewhere from this. Thank you so much! :)
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete de nouo amici!

    Equal perplexity confronts me with Snodv (# 4) here. And that compounded by petri, for while according to LSJ Greek shows both masculine πέτρος (petros) and feminine πέτρα (petra), Latin, it seems, has (as Snodv remarks) only the latter, except as in (Saint) Petrus so sur-named by Jesus in the New Testament, after 'Simon'. I am wondering whether something has dropped out, or if adfectorum might be corrupted from interfectorum, the assassins in 44 BC.

    I remain inclined to think, however, that this quasi-Latin is of the Romanes ire ad domum variety, by Google-translate out of Nonsense.com. (And I bet, in a lifetime of schoolmastering, I have encountered at least as much bad Latin as Snodv:)!)

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