Obey or refuse!

astlanda

Senior Member
Estonian maamurre
Hello!

How many ways are there in Arabic to refuse or obey an order?

I can recall right now only:
1. amrak (amrik etc.) = Ok! I'll do it.
2. laa = No! I won't.

E.G. as an answer to "Open the window!"
 
  • Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    It depends on the order, the person ordering and the person being ordered as well as how "serious" the order is.

    Any way, possibilities range from:

    1. accepting: حاضر، أمرك، حسنًا، طيّب، زين، تأمر، من عينية، تدلل
    2. refusing: لا، ما أريد، أعذرني، آسف the first and second are rude, the two are polite.

    1. amrak (amrik etc.) = Ok! I'll do it.
    Actually, this is not OK, this is more like "your wish is my comand".
     

    faraula

    Senior Member
    polish
    asif is rude? really, i thought its rather polite way of saying no.
    could you give some sentence examples?

    Thank you.
     

    londonmasri

    Senior Member
    English
    asif is rude? really, i thought its rather polite way of saying no.
    could you give some sentence examples?

    Thank you.
    It's not rude - it just means sorry.

    I think he meant the first two on the right not the left.

    To accept (in Egypt) '7aaDir' is the best I think. Also you can say 'maashi', which means 'alright/ no problem/ fine!'.

    - ifta7 eshubbak!!
    - 7aaDir
     

    gsc

    Senior Member
    UK
    English
    asif is rude? really, i thought its rather polite way of saying no.
    Thank you.
    That might depend on whether you are reading right to left or left to right (as to which 2 are rude) ;)

    To accept (in Egypt) '7aaDir' is the best I think. Also you can say 'maashi', which means 'alright/ no problem/ fine!'.
    Now 'maashi' is a word I like. When you have VERY limited vocabularly like I have , a little 'maashi' goes a long way :D

    That said, I have trouble thinking that it can also mean things like 'that's it!' 'I'm out of here!' etc.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    faraula

    Senior Member
    polish
    Yes, now I see it depends from which side are you reading.

    Anyhow i have one remark: generally you don't really refuse in arabic :/ it's more common to say inshallah i will do, instead of saying straight forward "no".
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I think he meant the first two on the right not the left.
    Right, that is what I meant; sorry for the confusion.

    Also, I'm مها عودة; so it's a she ;)

    Anyhow i have one remark: generally you don't really refuse in arabic :/ it's more common to say inshallah i will do, instead of saying straight forward "no".
    Yes, I wanted to mention that; but slightly differently.

    The way I'm used to it is that when someone says "inshallah", I understand that he intends to do it but later; except in Khaliji dialect where it means a direct yes.

    When someone says الله كريم or الله يعين or نشوف بعدين; it means he does not intend to do it and he is just avoiding saying no directly. But that, I suppose, is a cultural thing not a linguistic one; Arabs tend to do that even when speaking English.
     
    Last edited:

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Obey (Badawi) there are many words we usually use. Here are some :
    1-Abshir!means rejoice! أبشر
    2-Aamir wa jeek aTaamir آمر واجيك أطامر, it literally means "command and I would come to you jumping":D/Ask and I would answer you right away.
    3-3alaa 3ini wraasi "on my eye and head"على عيني وراسي
    4-3laa khashmi على خشمي on my nose
    -----------
    Refuse(Badawi):
    1-maalik luwaa : مالك لوى May you not be sick with luwa( a kind of disease)
    2.bidaa بدى
    3-laa
    4-mahuub 3alaa alkhshaiym,ماهو بعلى الخشيم it is not on my nose
     

    yasmeena

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Lebanon)
    It depends on the order, the person ordering and the person being ordered as well as how "serious" the order is.
    Exactly.

    You can simply say 'Okay' . I think 'Maashi' is used in many Arab countries too.
    I usually say تكرم\تكرمي (tikram\tikrami) or تكرم عيونك for an 'Ok, I'll do it'.

    when someone says "inshallah", I understand that he intends to do it but later
    That's how I personally use the word. But when I receive inshAllah as an answer, it depends on the tone; for it could mean anything : yes/no/undecided yet .

    Originally Posted by Mahaodeh
    Also, I'm مها عودة; so it's a she
    I used to read it مهودة - دلع مهدي :) till I noticed everybody calling you Maha, so I managed to read it right :idea:


    Refuse(Badawi):
    1-maalik luwaa : مالك لوى May you not be sick with luwa( a kind of disease)
    2.bidaa بدى
    3-laa
    4-mahuub 3alaa alkhshaiym,ماهو بعلى الخشيم it is not on my nose
    Very interesting :)
     
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