Oblivion's Veil or the Veil of Oblivion

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Luna20

New Member
Spanish - Venezuela
Hi! I work as a freelance translator (English - Spanish and Viceversa) and right now I'm working on a translation (Spa - Eng) where I find this phrase repeatedly in Spanish: < --- > ... I don't know how would it sound better "Oblivion's Veil" or "the Veil of Oblivion". Could anyone help me out with this doubt? Thank you!


< Spanish phrase removed. Cagey, moderator >
 
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  • Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi! I work as a freelance translator (English - Spanish and Viceversa) and right now I'm working on a translation (Spa - Eng) where I find this phrase repeatedly in Spanish: "El Velo del Olvido"... I don't know how would it sound better "Oblivion's Veil" or "the Veil of Oblivion". Could anyone help me out with this doubt? Thank you!
    Is this an idiomatic phrase - that is, does it mean something in Spanish apart from its literal meaning? If so, that meaning might work better rather than a literal translation.
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    Definitely - the Veil of Oblivion.
    'oblivion' is not a person, with some item associated with them: Salome's veils, Superman's cape, Cleopatra's Needle, the Queen's English -
     

    Luna20

    New Member
    Spanish - Venezuela
    "Passing from Limbo to Earth is done through the Oblivion’s Veil that, like its name states, makes us forget our previous existence.", that's one of the phrases found in the text. And no, it is not an idiomatic phrase, it just means that, veil of forgetfulness, veil of oblivion.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    "Passing from Limbo to Earth is done through the Oblivion’s Veil that, like its name states, makes us forget our previous existence.", that's one of the phrases found in the text. And no, it is not an idiomatic phrase, it just means that, veil of forgetfulness, veil of oblivion.
    Definitely - the Veil of Oblivion.
    'oblivion' is not a person, with some item associated with them: Salome's veils, Superman's cape, Cleopatra's Needle, the Queen's English -
    I agree. I wouldn't capitalize it, though.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I think I would - it is the name of a region.
    Is it? If it is a formal place name, then yes, it should be capitalized. The OP alternately capitalizes it, and calls it "a phrase", so it's hard to tell.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Definitely - the Veil of Oblivion.
    'oblivion' is not a person, with some item associated with them: Salome's veils, Superman's cape, Cleopatra's Needle, the Queen's English -
    I agree that the Veil of Oblivion works better in this context, but I do not agree with the reason offered by MilkyBarKid. It is in no way necessary that a word name a person in order to use the "Saxon genitive" possessive form.
     
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