observed in practice

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Dr.Appalayya

Senior Member
India;Telugu
Please correct the following sentence, please.

"In non-standard jobs like technicians, attendants etc, though the system is modeled on what is happening government departments, a fair amount of flexibility is observed in practice in respect of promotions, fixation of salary and salary grades".

The purport of last sentence is that rules are not strictly followed, principle of convenience and flexibility followed and the same has been observed in the research.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Please correct the following sentence, please.

    "In non-standard jobs like positions such as technicians, attendants, etc., though the system is modeled on what is happening in government departments, in actual practice, a fair amount of flexibility is observed in practice in respect of regarding promotions, fixation setting of salaryies and salary grades".

    The purport of last sentence is that rules are not strictly followed, principle of convenience and flexibility followed and the same has been observed in the research.
    "Non-standard" is a strange phrase to my ears. To whose standard? Compared to what standard? Why are they "non-standard"? Is this a common term used in the hospital?
     

    SpanishStudent_39

    Senior Member
    USA (English)
    Oh, I just realized that maybe you didn't mean "nonstandard" is strange to your ears, but that "nonstandard jobs" and "nonstandard positions" are strange to your ears.

    I think a nonstandard job would be a job that unusual. This context doesn't seem to indicate that the jobs being discussed are unusual, because "technician" and "attendant" don't seem to be unusual jobs. But it depends on the company. For instance, if you're talking about a beauty salon, "technician" and "attendant" could perhaps be called nonstandard positions. I can't say for sure without more context.

    What kind of company or companies is the sentence talking about?
     

    jinti

    Senior Member
    "In non-standard jobs such as technicians, attendants, etc., though the system is modeled on what is happens in government departments, a fair amount of flexibility is observed in practice with respect to promotions, fixation of salary and salary grades".
    I think that the simple present is better for "what happens in government departments" because it refers to habitual, repeated actions -- the norm.

    I'm fine with "is observed in practice", although I see that Dimcl took the practice part out. I read practice as opposed to theory or the ideal. In theory, they're supposed to follow the rules to the letter, but in practice they're pretty flexible.
     

    AcrophobicPixie

    Member
    English, United States of America
    "Though the system is modeled on what is happening in government departments, in non-standard jobs like technicians, attendants, etc, though the system is modeled on what is happening government departments, a fair amount of flexibility is observed in practice in respect of promotions, fixation of salary, and salary grades".
    To my eyes and ears, it seems like you had the right words, just in the wrong order to sound natural. The cut out section got moved to the start of the sentence, with a word added in, and fixed puncuation. Bold text equals edits, red text equals additions. I hope this helps you.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I think that the simple present is better for "what happens in government departments" because it refers to habitual, repeated actions -- the norm.

    I'm fine with "is observed in practice", although I see that Dimcl took the practice part out. I read practice as opposed to theory or the ideal. In theory, they're supposed to follow the rules to the letter, but in practice they're pretty flexible.
    Nope, I didn't take "practice" out, Jinti. If you look again, I moved it and inserted the word "actual". It's a necessary part of the context, I think.
     
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