Obsolete or antiquated

a.d.a.m

Member
Polish
I believe the meaning of adjectives obsolete and antiquated is quite the same. Question is, which of those two is more common in use in sentences like:
- Do not write "sincerely yours", it's obsolete/antiquated phrase. "Sincerely" is just fine.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I believe the meaning of adjectives obsolete and antiquated is quite the same. Question is, which of those two is more common in use in sentences like:
    - Do not write "sincerely yours", it's obsolete/antiquated phrase. "Sincerely" is just fine.
    Actually obsolete is a lot older than antiquated; so old that it's become redundant (sigh). 'Sincerely your's is still used, so it's not obsolete.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I believe the meaning of adjectives obsolete and antiquated is quite the same. No - they are quite different

    "People in small villages on the Nile still use the shadoof to obtain water. The shadoof is an antiqued system; it has been used for 5000 years ago, and is still in use today." (Here is a picture of a shadoof:- http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_115/1169541971gs6Qj6.jpg)

    "When advancing technology allowed more advanced automobiles, the Model-T Ford became obsolete." -
    1. no longer in general use; fallen into disuse,
    2. of a discarded or outmoded type; out of date: an obsolete battleship.
    3. (of a linguistic form) no longer in use, especially, out of use for at least the past century.

    NB: - Do not write "sincerely yours", it's an obsolete/antiquated phrase. "Sincerely" is just fine.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I believe the meaning of adjectives obsolete and antiquated is quite the same. No - they are quite different

    "People in small villages on the Nile still use the shadoof to obtain water. The shadoof is an antiqued system; it has been used for 5000 years ago, and is still in use today." (Here is a picture of a shadoof:- http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_115/1169541971gs6Qj6.jpg)

    "When advancing technology allowed more advanced automobiles, the Model-T Ford became obsolete." -
    1. no longer in general use; fallen into disuse,
    2. of a discarded or outmoded type; out of date: an obsolete battleship.
    3. (of a linguistic form) no longer in use, especially, out of use for at least the past century.

    NB: - Do not write "sincerely yours", it's an obsolete/antiquated phrase. "Sincerely" is just fine.
    I saw a sentence for "Time" and it may not fit in the explanation by you. I am confused. Would you give me some advice?

    "Indeed, your average computer is virtually obsolete by the time it is skipped from the factory to the retailstore. (TIME, Nov.11, 1996, p.16) "
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Your example contains some errors:
    .
    "Indeed, your average computer is virtually obsolete by the time it is shipped from the factory to the retail store. (TIME, Nov.11, 1996, p.16) "

    This example fits the second definition of obsolete quoted by PaulQ.
    The WordReference Random House says the same thing, but it may be clearer for this context.
    .
    no longer useful; out-of-date: an obsolete battleship.

    When computers become obsolete, they can no longer be used with the newer software and other electronic equipment that people have started to use.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Your example contains some errors:
    .
    "Indeed, your average computer is virtually obsolete by the time it is shipped from the factory to the retail store. (TIME, Nov.11, 1996, p.16) "

    This example fits the second definition of obsolete quoted by PaulQ.
    The WordReference Random House says the same thing, but it may be clearer for this context.
    .
    no longer useful; out-of-date: an obsolete battleship.

    When computers become obsolete, they can no longer be used with the newer software and other electronic equipment that people have started to use.
    Thanks for your reminding. I seem to misunderstand Paul's explanation. Does he mean the difference between "obsolete" and "antiquated" is that "obsolete" has a same meaning as "antiquated" while "obsolete" has two more meaning that "antiquated" doesn't have?
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    As I understand the explanation, he means that 'antiquated' means something like 'old fashioned'. Something can be 'antiquated' and still be used, but it will look or sound old.

    On the other hand, if something is obsolete, it is no longer used.

    Beryl is saying the same thing in her post about 'sincerely yours'.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    As I understand the explanation, he means that 'antiquated' means something like 'old fashioned'. Something can be 'antiquated' and still be used, but it will look or sound old.

    On the other hand, if something is obsolete, it is no longer used.

    Beryl is saying the same thing in her post about 'sincerely yours'.
    I was confused by the variation of the meaning, because in this sentence on Time. The computers have just been sent to the retail store which seem not that outdated. And it is much clearer. Thank you very much.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    They are exaggerating to make a point. They say that things are changing so fast that computers are obsolete before you even buy them in the store.

    Of course that is not really true, but it expresses the idea that things are changing extremely rapidly.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    They are exaggerating to make a point. They say that things are changing so fast that computers are obsolete before you even buy them in the store.

    Of course that is not really true, but it expresses the idea that things are changing extremely rapidly.
    I see. Maybe I am too serious about every word. Thank you very much.:D
     
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