Obvious trash

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
Parent: Our vacuum machine is broken. Could you help cleaning? You just need to pick up all of those"obvious trash" on the carpet.
Child: OK.
Parent: Thank you!

Can I use "obvious trash" to mean those trash which are easy to see? For instance, pieces of cookie cracker, small pieces of paper, and etc. Thank you.
 
  • jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    I would perhaps say "You just need to pick up all the stuff that's on the carpet." The word "obvious" is unlikely to be used in this context.
    Thank you sound shift.
    Can I say "pick up all the trash on the carpet" instead?
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    The vacuum cleaner is broken. Could you help daddy by picking up any rubbish you see on the carpet and putting it in the trash/garbage can?
    Thank you You little ripper.
    Does "rubbish" mean small trash? Does "rubbish" have the same meaning in AmE?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Does "rubbish" mean small trash?
    It means any form of rubbish/trash, large or small. You could say, Could you help daddy by picking up any small bits of rubbish you see on the carpet and putting it in the trash/garbage can? if you wanted to.

    Does "rubbish" have the same meaning in AmE?
    I think so. I'm sure an American will come along soon to confirm (or not). :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The parent could have decided that the child might not be able differentiate between trash and some things that they might want to retain. So she says to pick up those things that are quite obviously trash, and leave those things that seem a bit ambiguous to you.

    I don't know that is what was meant, but giving the writer the benefit of the doubt there could be a reason for including "obvious".

    I might say, "Please throw out everything you know is garbage and I will sort out the rest."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think 'obvious' was meant to describe the bits of rubbish that the child can actually see, and not attempt to pick up all the fine dust and stuff that the (currently broken) vacuum cleaner would usually suck up.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    What a child "knows" is garbage may not necessarily be that though, Packie. I'd be checking the garbage can just to make sure. Maybe I have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder! :D
    I was trying to justify the writer's use of "obvious".

    If I were saying it, I'd probably say, "Just leave that shit on the floor for now. When we get the vacuum fixed I'll take care of it."

    Or, "Just leave that for now. Nela (my housekeeper) knows where the vacuum is (I don't vacuum, but I think the vac is in the hall closet)."
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    The vacuum cleaner is broken. Could you help daddy by picking up any litter you see on the carpet and putting it in the trash/garbage can?

    In US, can I use litter?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I wouldn't use "litter" in that way. "Litter" meaning "rubbish" to me suggests rubbish in public places and in an indoor context suggests things (not only rubbish) scattered untidily around.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I wouldn't use "litter" in that way. "Litter" meaning "rubbish" to me suggests rubbish in public places and in an indoor context suggests things (not only rubbish) scattered untidily around.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    Does "rubbish" mean small trash? Does "rubbish" have the same meaning in AmE?
    As ripper said, "rubbish" means trash of any size. It's used in AE, but much less often than "trash" or "garbage."
     
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