Occitan niçard: Aloura, esplica vous comme voulâ, ma pressas lou pas!

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adj1001

Member
American English
Would some kind person out there help me? In a 1933 novel I've come across a phrase in Niçois (at least according to the author) and have no confidence in my translation of it.

"Aloura, esplica vous comme voulâ, ma pressas lou pas!"

My best guess is, "Well, say what you like, but don't rush (us?)!"

Is it Niçois? And what does it really say? Thank you very much for any help you can offer.
 
  • CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    Like janpol said, but with vous: Alors, expliquez-vous comme vous voulez, mais pressez le pas.

    In case you're interested in the pronunciation, all of the verbs are accented on the last syllable: esplica-vous, voulâ, pressas.
     

    deca dela

    New Member
    English Australian
    I'm no expert at Niçois but it looks like " Well explain (it) however (or say whatever ) you want but for (goodness sake) hurry up (about it)" or "get a move on"
    Something along these lines would work colloquially in English, depending on context
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    Is it Niçois? And what does it really say? Thank you very much for any help you can offer.
    Hello.

    Yes, it sounds plausible. The standard Occitan spelling of the sentence would be "Alora, explicatz-vos coma volatz, mas pressatz lo pas!" I'm not sure if you speak French (your profile doesn't state it), so here goes my English translation of the segments of the sentence. I "fixed" the mistralian (romanilhan) spelling of some words for the sake of clarity and included the standard transcription for each part.

    Aloura | Alora (italianism, possibly a ligurianism): 'now', 'well', 'so';
    esplicà-vous coume voulà | explicatz-vos coma (more dialectally, come) volatz: 'explain yourself/ves how(ever) you wish'; volatz is Subjunctive, hence the however thing; 'say what you will in your defense' is also a possible translation;
    ma | mas: 'but';
    pressàs lou pas | pressatz lo pas: 'hurry up' (imperative); (literally, 'hurry your step up', cf. French pressez le pas 'hurry up');


    Sources: own knowledge and glottophile.forumperso.com/t189-fiche-provencal
    As you can see, I'm not a native speaker of English, so forgive me if any of the translations sounds odd.
     

    adj1001

    Member
    American English
    Thank you very much for the spelling help (I'm happy to be able to correct it) and the translation suggestion, which is very much along the lines I had in mind (no need to apologize at all).
     
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