Occitan: pèiro fulhado, pèira fuelhada

Uncle B

Senior Member
German
Péiro fulhado is the name of a stone in a text from Southern France.

The sentence is: Il y a un autre mégalithique schisteux appelé "Pèiro fulhado".

There is no other context.

I have found staircase for peiro and covered with leaves for fulhado but that seems a bit strange.

Or maybe: stone covered with leaves?
 
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  • AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    covered with leaves for fulhado but that seems a bit strange.
    I agree it's strange.
    My idea is that in this case, the Occitan word "fulhado" (from fulha/fuelha, Catalan: fulla, French: feuille) doesn't refer to the leaves of a tree, but it's probably a geology thing: there are stones and rocks where the separate layers ("leaves") are clearly visible. These might be compared to "pâte feuilletée" (Blätterteig).

    DSC00358 Ancienne carriere  sous le Mourre Blanc-pierre feuilletee.jpg

    pate feuilletée.jpg
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    You're welcome. I think the idea is plausible, and I hope it's correct, but it's just an assumption, I might as well be totally wrong.
    It would be nice to have a picture of the stone.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    FEUILLETÉ : Définition de FEUILLETÉ

    [En parlant d'une roche] Qui présente l'aspect de feuillets, qui se divise ou est composée de feuillets, de lames minces superposées. Texture feuilletée ou lamelleuse. Une substance calcaire, d'un tissu tantôt feuilleté, et tantôt aussi dense et aussi dur que le marbre (Cuvier, Anat. comp.,t. 1, 1805, p. 115).Des croupes d'ardoises feuilletées et fines comme des soies brillent au soleil (Hugo, Rhin,1842, p. 268).Des schistes rouges et cœur de pigeon, ou violet sombre, à texture feuilletée, qui paraissent saigner (Pesquidoux, Livre raison,1925, p. 176).
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Yes, but in Mistralian spelling which is used for Provençal dialect if I recall correctly. In the standard this would be pèira fuelhada.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    I agree it's strange.
    My idea is that in this case, the Occitan word "fulhado" (from fulha/fuelha, Catalan: fulla, French: feuille) doesn't refer to the leaves of a tree, but it's probably a geology thing: there are stones and rocks where the separate layers ("leaves") are clearly visible. These might be compared to "pâte feuilletée" (Blätterteig).
    I agree. In fact, pasta fullada is how we call it in Catalan.

    This is because in Catalan, fullat/fullada can come from fulla 'leaf' but also from full, which is either a sheet of paper or, regarding other materials, a thin layer. I'm assuming a little here too, but I'd say that the same applies to the Occitan fuèlha/fuèlh pair. So I'd agree with a very likely interpretation of it being "in thin layers".

    Page 31 of this journal by the Catalan Onomastics Society (http://www.onomastica.cat/wp-content/uploads/Noms-1-2014.pdf) mentions related placenames in the Catalonia-Southern France area, such as Rocafull - Roquefuèlh/Roquefeuil, in which the idea is that of a rock in thin leaf-like layers.
     
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