o'clock + a.m. (p.m.)

LinguaFan

Senior Member
Russia
Hello,

speaking about time, can we use o'clock and a.m. (p.m.) in the same phrase? For example:
The bombings started at 8 o'clock a.m.

THank you.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Nitpicking editors intent on concise writing will point out that "8 o'clock a.m." is egregiously wordy while they are striking out the "o'clock."

    "8 a.m." is all you need. :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    "8 o'clock a.m." is very uncommon in AmE writing but it's considerably more common in speech.
    Oh, I didn't know that! I would never say 8 o'clock a.m. If it's in speech, it would presumably find its way into the kind of writing that reflects the informal style (reported speech and such like).
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I wouldn't say it either - except as an error, for example if I started to say "8 o'clock" but then decided I needed to add that "a.m." part. But I definitely hear it. In some cases it's probably a simple error, but I think some people do it for emphasis, really.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't think I'd say it. The purpose of "o'clock" is to inform a listener or reader that a number is a time of day, not one of the other things that a number can mean. Saying "a.m." or "p.m." does that, so adding "o'clock" is redundant.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I don't think I'd say it. The purpose of "o'clock" is to inform a listener or reader that a number is a time of day, not one of the other things that a number can mean. Saying "a.m." or "p.m." does that, so adding "o'clock" is redundant.
    Yes, but then many forms of emphasis could be considered redundant. As I said, I don't say this, but I hear other people doing so, and I think this is usually the reason.
     
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