oddly ‘heraldic’ image

Shahruzraad

Senior Member
Farsi
The text is from a play called "A Window." What writer is describing: " It is an oddly ‘heraldic’ image as if the whole sleeve had been dipped in red paint" has he mentioned some kind of tattoo?

He pulls the jacket from his shoulders. His right shirtsleeve is soaked in blood. It is almost dry. It is an oddly ‘heraldic’ image as if the whole sleeve had been dipped in red paint. His hand is almost clean.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In heraldry, apparently red (gules) indicates courage. I’ve no idea whether that might be significant? I don’t think anyone would be quite sure what the writer meant by “heraldic” in that comment.
     

    rae1

    Member
    Russian
    I think "heraldic" is used as a synonym for schematic, symbolic, too regular to be natural or accidental. It doesn't look as a soiled shirt, it looks as if it were painted deliberately and with precision, as on a coat-of-arms. I don't think that there is any connection with the exact meaning of red color (or of an image of an arm) in heraldry, otherwise why the quotation marks.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Is it a reference to this perhaps? (Arms of the house of Hastings.)

    1627667279132.png
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    Is it a reference to this perhaps? (Arms of the house of Hastings.)
    That would be my take. This is an odd shape, but conceptually to the people of the time, this was an arm and sleeve. The fashion of the time was for [wealthy] women to have long pieces of fabric that draped from their wrists. So the shape at the right of the image is a shoulder; the left is where the wrist would be, and all of the apostrophe-shaped part hanging down is the empty fabric drape.
     
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