of a Sunday

diogerepus

Senior Member
Korean
Here is a sentence that I can't understand.

He would often come to see me of a Sunday.

Why is there 'of'? What function does 'of' do in this sentence?
 
  • Ed the Editor

    Senior Member
    diogerepus said:
    Here is a sentence that I can't understand.

    He would often come to see me of a Sunday.

    Why is there 'of'? What function does 'of' do in this sentence?
    Hi Diogerepus,

    At least in the U.S., a phrase like "of a Sunday" is generally used only in texts that are very old, very literary, or both. It's an idiom, and it's perfectly grammatical. I've NEVER heard it used in speech. I don't know how common it is in British usage.

    The regular way to say it would be "He would often come to see me on Sunday" or "He would often come to see me on Sundays."

    I hope this is helpful.

    -- Ed
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    HI there. I have heard people say it, in the Midlands of the UK, but it is surely a dialect rather than Standard English.
     
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