of/ noun-as-adjective

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello, guys

I saw a headline on CNN money website that reads: Chesapeake Energy ex CEO Aubrey Mc Clendon car crash 911 calls released by police

I don't know if it is because we are talking about a headline, but I found it with many noun-as-adjectives joined together. I would like to know if I can rewrite it as follows:

"911 calls of Chesapeake Energy's ex CEO Aubrey Mc Clendon car crash released by police"

or without 's: "911 calls of Cheasepeake Energy ex CEO Aubrey Mc Clendon car crash released by police"

Could I do it or not?

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Or no. It really depends on how quickly you want to be understood.

    It took me about ten seconds to understand what this line meant. I would have got it in about 1.5 seconds if it had said "The 911 calls relating to Aubrey Mc Clendon's car crash (former CEO of Cheasepeake Energy) have been released by police". But journalists don't write like that these days - they go by print-size instead of intelligibility.

    So, "you pays your money and you takes your choice".
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Or no. It really depends on how quickly you want to be understood.

    It took me about ten seconds to understand what this line meant. I would have got it in about 1.5 seconds if it had said "The 911 calls relating to Aubrey Mc Clendon's car crash (former CEO of Cheasepeake Energy) have been released by police". But journalists don't write like that these days - they go by print-size instead of intelligibility.

    So, "you pays your money and you takes your choice".
    But are you referring to the sentence in the headline or the one I propposed? I mean, can 't I write like I did? Even if I put "of" in, is the sentence still confused?

    "911 calls of Cheasepeake Energy's former CEO Aubrey Mc Clendon car crash relased by police"

    or "911 calls of Cheasepeake Energy former CEO Aubrey Mc Clendond's car crash released by police"

    Don't any of these two work? Isn't any of them better?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I'll repeat what I said in #3 in different words:

    The choice is yours. It is very hard to understand phrases like this, stripped of their verbs, articles and punctuation. The more help you can give your reader the better. If you don't want to add the verbs and articles, at least add the punctuation.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's my impression that the 911 calls relating to that car crash were not made by McClendon but by others reporting the event to the emergency services. I don't believe that McClendon communicated prior to the crash, and I think he was killed instantly.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    It's my impression that the 911 calls relating to that car crash were not made by McClendon but by others reporting the event to the emergency services. I don't believe that McClendon communicated prior to the crash, and I think he was killed instantly.
    But when I said "911 calls of Mc Clendon's car crash", doesn't it is clear that the 911 calls are related to the Mc Clendon's car crash?I mean, related to the accident? It doesn't mean that Mc clendon was the one who made the calls, does it?
     
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