~ of supporting Russia's military.

Rainfall

New Member
Chinese
One of the Financial Times headlines: US accuses five firms in China of supporting Russia's military.

What role is the prepositional phrase "of supporting" play in the sentence? Adjective or adverb?
If 'of supporting' is to modify the main verb 'accuse', so it is reasonable that it is an adverb?

Your comment is highly appreciated.
 
  • Rainfall

    New Member
    Chinese
    "Of supporting Russia's military" is an object complement, which makes it an adjective.
    Here's the analysis of the sentence 'US accuses five firms in China of supporting Russia's military.'
    subject: US
    verb: accuses
    object: five firms
    Object complement:prepositional phrase I "in China" as an adjective to describe 'five firms'
    object complement: prepositional phrase II "of supporting Russia's military" as an adjective to describe 'five firms':
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Object complement:prepositional phrase I "in China" as an adjective to describe 'five firms'
    I'd just call "five firms in China" the object. "In China" just says where the five firms are; it says nothing about the manner in which they are accused.

    As you can see, I include "of" in the complement, meaning that it is an adjective, whereas entangledbank includes "of" with the verb, and so the complement is "supporting Russia's military", which is a noun phrase.
     
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