of, to, for

< Previous | Next >

trilussa

Member
italiano
thanks in advance of your enormous help.
(When I'm grammatically or syntactically wrong in anything of/in my writing, plase I'll be so grateful of/for your notice).

Into Italian the meaning of all the prepositions in the following examples is "for"
I don't understand very well why you say " It's kind of you to do this..."
but " I'll do this for you...."
or " It's not right to me"

Finally what's right to say: " I'll be grateful of/for/ your notice (noun)
" " " that you make me notice it or what else?
Bye to you all!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Thanks in advance of for your enormous* help.
    (When I'm grammatically or syntactically wrong in anything of/ in my writing [...]
    *enormous doesn't really work here: we'd be more likely to say for all your help.
    I don't understand very well why you say "It's kind of you to do this..."
    but "I'll do this for you...."
    or "It's not right to me"
    "Just because." Because English prepositions work one way, Italian ones work differently.
    Finally what's right to say: "I'll be grateful of/for/ your notice (noun)
    "that you make me notice it or what else?
    I'll be grateful if someone tells me.
    I'll be grateful if someone lets me know.
     

    trilussa

    Member
    italiano
    Thank you very much (Ewi and Brasiamerica) that you've paid attention to my question ( again, I would appreciate your corrections).

    I ask you pardon if I couldn't be clear in my exposition yesterday, however, what you've said is important to me. Put it in these words: I know that English language uses prepositions in a different way compared to the italian's. This is just because I wish I can understand . What I say is trying to understand what kind of relation you mother tongue set up in sentencies like : !) It's not correct to me to do this

    2) I'll do this for you

    The italian correct preposition in both cases is "for" as it suggests that something is however done in the direction/ toward someone/something .
    I hope I could let me understood more clearly. thanks again
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hmmm ... well ... that's a really difficult question, Trilussa ~ the subject of what prepositions actually mean is probably beyond the scope of this forum. I'll have a go, though. Consider these:
    (1) It doesn't seem right to me.
    (2) It's not right for me to do this.
    (3) I'll do it to you.
    (4) I'll do it for you.

    To me in (1) means 'in my opinion'.
    For me in (2) means ............................ wow, impossible to paraphrase. The whole thing means: It is not right that I should do this.
    To you in (3) means 'acting against you', 'in action against you'.
    For you in (4) means 'on your behalf', 'instead of you', 'as a favour for you'.

    See the problem(s)? ~ not only is it unbelievably difficult to say what prepositions mean ... it's also the case that English prepositions can have multiple meanings. (I'm sure this is true of Italian too ~ you just don't realize it because you use them all day every day without thinking about it.)
     

    trilussa

    Member
    italiano
    Thank you Ewie, you are clear to me.
    Now I should ask, can your above mentioned examples of a preposition keep the same relation/meanings for sentencies even if they sound different, so that I can take it as a rule? Thanks and good night!!!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top