Off at the accountant’s

  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Moderator note

    Please provide a complete sentence, its source, and the context and background, or have your question deleted.
     

    upgrader

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Sure. It's True Believer by Nicholas Sparks, in chapter 8. Here is the paragraph:

    He’d hoped that Doris would have some insight, but it just so happened that she wasn’t around, either. Off at the accountant’s, they said, but she’d be back in a little while. Which, of course, didn’t help him at all, since his lunch break was almost over, and he couldn’t exactly wait around for her. And besides, she’d probably deny knowing anything about it. << maximum of 4 sentences >>

    I guess it's a phrase or idiom that I don't understand. Thank you in advance.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is just a truncated form of "She is off at the accountant's" which is the same as saying "She is not here (= she's off), she has gone to the accountant's"
     

    upgrader

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Andygc,

    Thank you so much for the explanation. It's pretty simple, isn't it? But I was thinking something else, and just couldn't get out of it. With your sentences, I see it makes perfect sense. So really appreciate it.

    upgrader
     
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