off out up the woods

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Jay meets Paul on the street and they start chatting. Jay tells him the news that someone got raped at the old shopping centre. Among other things, Paul asks her:
-- Guess you're all off out tonight?
-- We're all off out every night, up the woods.
-- Just be careful of the, you know, rapist.
The Fades, TV series

Does it just mean they (probably with classmates) go out into the woods and spend their time there? Thank you.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Then I have two questions:)

    1. I've never heard of "off out". Does "off" here means go away from home?

    2. Does "up" in "up the woods" mean movement towards the woods, or is it movement when you are already in the woods (like "walk up the street")?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sort of. We say such things as 'I'm off out to the pub', or 'I'm off out to get some milk'.

    In this context, 'Up the woods' means 'in the woods'. If you said 'I'm going up the woods' it would mean 'to the woods'.

    Perhaps the most common usage of this is 'up the pub'. Either 'He's up the pub' (= he's in the pub), or 'Let's go up the pub' (= Let's go to the pub').
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Sort of. We say such things as 'I'm off out to the pub', or 'I'm off out to get some milk'.

    In this context, 'Up the woods' means 'in the woods'. If you said 'I'm going up the woods' it would mean 'to the woods'.

    Perhaps the most common usage of this is 'up the pub'. Either 'He's up the pub' (= he's in the pub), or 'Let's go up the pub' (= Let's go to the pub').
    I.e., it has nothing to do with levels -- higher/lower, or directions -- North/South, or whatever... Right?
     
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