''Off'' Vs ''Off to''

ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
I have a confusion about ''off'' and ''off to''

Sentence a )

''I am off Scotland tomorrow'' means ; ''I will be away from scotland tomorrow''

Sentence b)

''I am off to Scotland tomorrow'' ; ''I am going to Scotland tomorrow''

Are meanings of the sentences correct?

Are both sentences grammatically correct and idiomatic?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Sentence b) is correct, but not a). You can be off work, meaning not at work, but that is only one expression; 'out' can't be used like that generally.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It's the same in AE. Sentence (a) is incorrect. In general "off" is the opposite of "on". Nobody would say "I am on Scotland tomorrow."

    Sentence (b) is correct, but the phrase "off to Scotland" uses be off, not off to. The to is part of to Scotland. This is meaning 34 of "off" in the WordReference dictionary:

    34. starting on one's way; leaving [be + off] I'm off to Europe on Monday.

    Some other examples of how "off" is used this way:

    After breakfast, we'll be off.
    I'll see you off, before I go to work.

     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    You can be off work, meaning not at work, but that is only one expression
    what about ''being off school''?
    I was off school when the terorists attacked my school ( I wanted to mean ; I was not at school, I was away at that time)?
    is it correct as ''being off work'' ?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, 'off school' works like 'off work', and there might be one or two other words it can be used with like this. I couldn't think of any when I wrote my first comment. It is still true that it can't be used generally like that, only in these two or three fixed expressions.
     
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