Old Irish "adraid" vs Welsh "adrodd"

Margrave

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hi!

I am stuck with this subject and need help. In Old Irish "adraid" means "to worship". In Welsh, "adrodd" means to report, to talk, to narrate. EDIL says that adraid came from Latin adorare. I could not find the etymology of Welsh adrodd. Are those two words related, do they really come from Latin? If they are related, I could not see how "adrodd" would come from adorare, it should have therefore a Celtic root there, perhaps.

Any advice is welcome. :)

Rgs

MG
 
  • Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Hi!

    I am stuck with this subject and need help. In Old Irish "adraid" means "to worship". In Welsh, "adrodd" means to report, to talk, to narrate. EDIL says that adraid came from Latin adorare. I could not find the etymology of Welsh adrodd. Are those two words related, do they really come from Latin? If they are related, I could not see how "adrodd" would come from adorare, it should have therefore a Celtic root there, perhaps.

    Any advice is welcome. :)

    Rgs

    MG
    Hello Margrave - long time no 'see'! Hope you are well.

    I can't help with Irish as my knowledge of any Celtic language outside my own is fairly limited.

    But did you not find the etymology for adroddaf1:adrodd3 in GPC? I can't give you the exact page here, but if you look up adroddaf1:adrodd3 in GPC you're sure to find something of interest. Let me know if you want me translate it ... :)

    Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru [adroddaf1:adrodd3]
     
    Last edited:

    Margrave

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Hi Sion, glad to meet you again here. Hope everything is fine with you.

    Thank you for pointing me the right words to search at the Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru. I searched some similar radicals there but could not find anything that could help me. Impatient as I am, I tried Google Translate. And voilà, thanks to you, I could understand that, like in Irish, they mean exactly narrate, speak, say, and the like. And there it is the IE root! Nothing to do with Latin adorare as the Irish dictionary mentioned. As I suspected, it may come directly from the IE and probaly was not imported from Latin. Thank you very much. :)

    I could not understand quite well "dichon mai i’r f. adroddaf2: adroddi y perthyn rhai o’r enghrau. yn yr ystyr ‘ailadrodd’]". Maybe you can help me with this translation?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    "dichon mai i’r f. adroddaf2: adroddi y perthyn rhai o’r enghrau. yn yr ystyr ‘ailadrodd’"

    = It may be that some of the exs. [examples] with the meaning of 'ailadrodd' [to repeat, to recite] belong to the verb adroddaf2: adroddi
     
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