old kid old sock

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jacdac, Jul 20, 2017.

  1. jacdac

    jacdac Senior Member

    Lebanese
    With it came a sudden wave of homesickness for Ogunquit, for the ocean, for the good Maine hills and pines. For no reason at all she suddenly thought of Gus, the parking lot attendant at the Ogunquit public beach, and for a moment she thought her heart would break with loss and sorrow.
    <...>
    One sob escaped her and it sounded so terrified and lonely that she clapped both hands over her mouth for the second time that day. No more, Frannie old kid old sock.
    Source: The Stand by Stephen King
    Context: Frannie broke into Harold house and while she exploring the rumpus room, she felt nostalgic. She was reminiscent of her hometown.

    Does the bolded expression refer to Eric Clapton's album title Old Sock or more to the slang archaic term 'Old Socks' as an informal way to address a man?

    Here's what follows the above citation:
    You don’t get over anything this big so quickly. A little at a time.

    Thank you.


     
  2. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    The following is a reaction to her own thoughts and memories: she realised that she would never again hear him say "Frannie, old kid, old sock."

    Old sock
    - a familiar method of addressing someone - mainly AE.

    Compare "Old bean; old thing, etc."
     
  3. kentix

    kentix Senior Member

    English - U.S.
    I've never heard of "old sock". It must be mainly someone else's AE. :)
     
  4. Sparky Malarky

    Sparky Malarky Moderator

    Indiana
    English - US
    :thumbsup:

    But then, this is Steven King.
     
  5. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Have you heard the plural?
    OED:
    Sock: (b) Slang and colloq. phrases: [...] old socks (orig. N. Amer.): a familiar form of address.

    1925 T. Dreiser Amer. Trag. I. ii. iii. 185 Gee, it's good to have a look at you, old socks!
    1934 H. G. Radcliffe in Passing Show 27 Jan. 5/4 Hey, Morrison, old socks. How's things!
    1950 R. Moore Candlemas Bay 19 Ninety..pounds, Jebby, old socks.
     
  6. kentix

    kentix Senior Member

    English - U.S.
    Nope. :)
     
  7. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You should adopt it... :D
     
  8. kentix

    kentix Senior Member

    English - U.S.
    Maybe it's mainly a Maine thing.:eek:
     
  9. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Sort of "1.3 million people, 5 surnames"? ...
     
  10. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    Is that 1950 example the last one given, or just the last one you quoted? Because it's a few years older than I am....
     
  11. jacdac

    jacdac Senior Member

    Lebanese
    Thank you. I am hesitant to say Thank you Old Socks in fear of offending someone.
     
  12. MikeFrance New Member

    English
    Hi all, I picked this expresion up in the 1970’s in England from an englishman who’s family used it for centuries (litterally) But it was the singular “HELLO OLD SOCK” a term of greeting to an old and valued friend. I must admit over the years there have been some that did not understand it, but they soon apreciated when they knew it was a term of endearment.
     
  13. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Interesting. I've never heard it in my life (and I've been around a while).;)
     
  14. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    I stand amazed at this.
    I am sure I’ve never come across this in the UK!
    When you say “over the years there have been some that did not understand it” I’d guess “some” here equals nearly 100%
     
  15. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Cheshire
    English / England
    Don’t say it, mainly for fear of turning into Steven King, or at least not being understood.
    :D
     
  16. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    This AE speaker has never heard it. I have been to Maine but it was never used at those times. On the other hand, I have heard Old bean.
     
  17. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    Eggs, Beans, and Crumpets.... :D
     

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