omit the word "tasks" in the phrase: perform pricing and merchandising tasks

bennyfriendly

Senior Member
korean
I have made up the example below.

(1a) ABC Groceries hired Tom yesterday. His manager is planning to train him how to perform pricing and merchandising tasks on his first day of work next week.

Is it correct to omit the word, tasks, from the second sentence, shown below?

(1b) ... His manager is planning to train him how to perform pricing and merchandising on his first day of work next week.

Thank you very much for your feedback and help.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No. It’s fine to talk about performing a task, but you wouldn’t talk about performing pricing and merchandising. And you can teach someone how to do a certain thing (though the “how” is not essential), but with the verb “train” you can only use the infinitive.

    His manager is planning to train him to perform pricing and merchandising tasks :tick:
    His manager is planning to train him in pricing and merchandising :tick::thumbsup:
    His manager is planning to teach him pricing and merchandising :tick::thumbsup:
     
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