omittable

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    Banned
    Australian Australia
    I will guess that this is a case of dictionaries not being able to keep up with the pace of change.
    I think that omittable meaning being able to be ommitted is in the process of being formally accepted into the language.

    .,,
     

    sarcie

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I will guess that this is a case of dictionaries not being able to keep up with the pace of change.
    I think that omittable meaning being able to be ommitted is in the process of being formally accepted into the language.
    I have noticed that this seems to be the case with a lot of "-able" words. When working, I occasionally pause to think whether they are "real words" or not, but they tend to be generally understandable. And in technical manuals, for example, when trying to save space, adding "-able" to replace "can be XXXed" helps a lot!
    Spoken English, I think, lets you away with a lot more "unofficial" vocabulary, so I would be more careful when writing. Having said that, I wouldn't pause over "omittable", even when reading - it seems perfectly fine to me! :tick:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Omissible!
    Why is it that I don't remember seeing it so often?
    Perhaps because it is a rather unusual word and most people would prefer to say "X may be omitted" or "X is optional" rather than "X is omissible".

    I see that omittable is used a great deal in links relating to Java and some other IT languages, usually in reference to omittable parameters.
     
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