Omitting auxiliaries

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JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
These are examples I came up with:
(1) I have been notified, but I'm not sure if she has been.
(2) I don't think they have done it, but they may have.

Is it possible to omit the last words from either of these example?

If so, which version is more natural?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    My take:

    (1) I have been notified, but I'm not sure if she has been.

    (2)I don't think they have done it, but they may have.:tick:

    Except: I would say in most contexts: I don't think they did it, but they may have done it.

    Sorry, but I cannot cite any sort of "rule" :(
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks.

    When you use "did" would you never omit "done it"?
    I don't think they did it, but they may have.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hate to keep bugging you, but would it make a difference if we had a different verb than 'do'?
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have overheard it.
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have.
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have done.


    Here, does your answer remain the same regarding the first two? And how about the last one?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hate to keep bugging you, but would it make a difference if we had a different verb than 'do'?
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have overheard it. No need to repeat it.
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have. :thumbsup:
    I don't think they overheard it, but they may have done.:thumbsdown:


    Here, does your answer remain the same regarding the first two? And how about the last one?
     
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