Omnibus terminal/Terminal (capitalized?)

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Damnjoe

Senior Member
U.S. English
Do I capitalize "terminal" if it is just a general Omnibus terminal? For example, "The hotel is right next to the Omnibus Terminal/terminal" Or "I walked to an Omnibus terminal/Terminal". I´m thinking that it´s capitalized, because it would be like that with Greyhound Bus Terminal, wouldn´t it? Maybe I´m just used to the Greyhound signs.
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    If you are referring to a terminal generally, you would not capitalize it: Most cities have a central bus terminal.

    If you are referring to a specific place whose name includes those words, you capitalize them: Bob crossed Eighth Avenue and walked into the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

    I have never in my life heard anyone use the word "omnibus" to refer to a bus without intending to be humorous, ironic, or archaic. There is no more reason to capitalize "omnibus" as a name for the vehicle than there is a reason to capitalize the word "bus".
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You do not need capital letters unless it is the unique name of a place/business. A general bus / rail terminal would need lower case.
     

    ribran

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I would write, "The hotel is right next to the (omni)bus terminal."

    Would you actually call it that, and not a "bus terminal"?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The only time I'd use the word "omnibus" with reference to transportation is if it happens to be the name of a bus company. There used to be a lot of those. There aren't many left now; the Buckland Omnibus Company of Woodbridge, Suffolk, England was the first that came up in my Web search. If it has a terminal, that would be the Buckland Omnibus Terminal.

    For a general terminal, though: no. Would you write "I took a Taxi to the Train station?" If you wouldn't, don't do it to a bus (omni or not) either.
     
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    Damnjoe

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    "Omnibus" is the name of a bus company that travels all over South America. There are "Omnibus terminals/Terminals" all over South America, usually only one in each city. The word is Spanish would be el Terminal de Omnibus. (With capitalization) But I´m not sure if it´s capitalized in English. So it would be the equivelent of "Greyhound Terminal/terminal."

    I understand that if I said something like "I´m going to the New York Greyhound Terminal" that it would be capitalized. But what if I´m not talking about a specific terminal? For example: "I´m going to a Greyhound terminal." My instincts tell me that it should be lower case.

    But then, what if a specific terminal is implied? Like, the New York Greyhound Terminal is close to my house, so I tell my friend, "I´m going to the Greyhound Terminal" ???

    Am I thinking about this too hard? I was trying to translate a hotel description, and it wanted to say that "the Omnibus Terminal/terminal (?) was close to the hotel." Sorry if I didn´t explain this well. Thanks all.
     
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    Damnjoe

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Not really.

    In New York, Greyhound buses terminate at the Port Authority Bus Terminal, which is neither owned nor operated by Greyhound.
    Yeah, but I´m not asking about who owns the terminal--I don´t live in New York, sorry--I´m asking about if it should be capitalized or not. Wouldn´t Port Authority Terminal capitalize the "Terminal"? But that´s not a company, it´s a place-name.

    So then, I guess it should be lowercase unless you put the proper name of a place before the name of the company... ? Does anyone have an offical source for this rule? Unless someone disagrees. This is such a moote point, man, language is stupid sometimes.

    So "I´m going to the Lima Omnibus Terminal" versus "I´m going to the Omnibus terminal around the block." ???
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...Does anyone have an offical source for this rule? Unless someone disagrees. This is such a moote point, man, language is stupid sometimes...
    The rule is very simple.

    Proper nouns - names of people, buildings, companies or anything else - are capitalized, except minor words such as "of" in "Radio Corporation of America." That includes the word "terminal" if it's part of one. Example: "New York City's Grand Central Terminal serves several commuter rail lines and houses the Oyster Bar restaurant."

    Ordinary nouns are not capitalized, unless they happen to begin a sentence. That includes the word "terminal" if it is not part of a proper noun.
    Example: "The main bus terminal in Boston is part of South Station."

    It is not a moot point. As for its stupidity: no more or less so than any number of arbitrary rules in every language.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Omnibus" is the name of a bus company that travels all over South America.
    I am unable to find such a company via Google. "Omnibus" as a generic term for "buses" is quite common, however, but as such, is not equivalent to "Greyhound."
     

    Damnjoe

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    So, I was stupid about this and was thinking of the wrong company. Ormeño is the name of the company. I got mixed up because all the bus stations in Peru say Omnibus in big capital letters on them. Apparently they say omnibus in peru for bus. Most places say autobus. Anyway, that would have been a better question for the Spanish forums, but I was confused. You guys cleared it up anyway. Thanks all.
     
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