on a bit of a break

NHHL

Senior Member
Singapore-English
- I read some love advice on a website and there's this sentence I don't understand "They're on a bit of a break". This means "They're going to break up or divorce or separate", correct?

Thanks very much!
 
  • MichaelW

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Can you give some more context?

    It could mean - "they're taking a small holiday", "they've stopped seeing each other for a while" - but hard to say without more of what is being said.
     
    - I read some love advice on a website and there's this sentence I don't understand "They're on a bit of a break". This means "They're going to break up or divorce or separate", correct?
    Without context, it's hard to say for sure, but "on a break" usually means that a couple have stopped seeing each for a short period, claiming the intention to return to their previous relationship at the end of the break.

    I say "claiming" because it is almost a cliche (thanks in part to the TV show Friends) to believe that couples "on a break" are really in the process of breaking up. However, the phrase does not mean "about to break up"; it means exactly what it says: taking a brief break from the relationship, which implies the intent to return to it.

    By the way, adding "a bit of" to the expression doesn't change the meaning significantly.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top