on (a) Christmas Eve

JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
It's what an NBC Nightly News anchor said when starting another news story:
Another big story on this night. A historic vote, a first for the Senate on Christmas Eve since the late 1800s, bringing health care reform one step closer to reality. Senate Democrats pushed through their version of the bill against unanimous opposition from Republicans.
My question is whether she could have said on a Christmas Eve instead. I would think that on Christmas Eve indicates that the context is confined to the current year, whereas on a Christmas Eve that it is extended over two or more years. And the context of the quoted portion seems to encompass more than a hundred years.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    My question is whether she could have said on a Christmas Eve instead. I would think that on Christmas Eve indicates that the context is confined to the current year, whereas on a Christmas Eve that it is extended over two or more years. And the context of the quoted portion seems to encompass more than a hundred years.
    Using "on Christmas Eve" doesn't confine it to the currrent year. It's normal and idiomatic that way.

    Using "on a Christmas Eve" also sounds fine and idiomatic to me, in this context.
     
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